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I created a class: NumberHelper

it has method: roll(num)

and I want to alias it, such as rollOnce, so I wrote:

static def rollOnce = NumberHelper.&roll

And the program throw an exception when I call rollOnce. How to do this in groovy?

More Detail:

First, we implement Number class for our own business, in Java

    def userBuildScript = findScript(name) as Closure
    use (NumberHelper, StringHelper, UserHelper){
        // first make the user object
        // then, businessNumberObject)

and we wrote a category class for our Number class, it is the NumberHelper above.

and in the build script:

    user(someRole) { user, number ->
         it.someProperty = number.roll() // here, an exception throw

    groovy.lang.MissingMethodException: No signature of method:,roll() is applicable for argument types

are these info enough to help me find the reason?

And thanks for answering, thanks:)

share|improve this question
Can you add the exception stack trace. And source code would be helpful too. – aldrin Jun 13 '12 at 10:27
Where/how are you defining rollOnce? If roll is static, and you remove the static keyword for rollOnce, it works fine--we need more context. – Dave Newton Jun 13 '12 at 12:32

1 Answer 1

What you have should work as long as the original roll method is also static. This works fine for me in groovy 1.8.6:

class NumberHelper {
    static def roll(num) {
        return new Random().nextInt(num) + 1

    static def rollOnce = NumberHelper.&roll

def roll = NumberHelper.roll(6)
assert roll <= 6 && roll >= 1

rollOnce = NumberHelper.rollOnce(10)
assert rollOnce <= 10 && rollOnce >= 1
share|improve this answer
I think they're working with a Groovy Category :-/ – tim_yates Jun 13 '12 at 13:37
Ah, missed that in the title, yeah we need to see the code to know what the OP is doing. – Ted Naleid Jun 13 '12 at 15:05

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