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We are having trouble in deciding where to put the ->flush() call in a Symfony2 application. Let's see if you can "inspire" us, please.

Our application is very big. It currently has about 30 bundles. We have 2 separate developer teams: one does frontend (controllers + twigs) and another does core (database + services + model, etc).

Frontend is one project (has its own bundles, which do not have any doctrine models nor logic nor services, but have twigs, public images and css and controllers), and lives in one repository.

Core is another project (has its own bundles, which offer services, model objects, etc, has doctrine objects in their inside and have no controllers nor twigs), and lives in another repo.

The goal of this approach is that our product is delivered with DIFFERENT FRONTENDS (Core+Frontend1 for the web, Core+Frontend2 for the mobiles, Core+Frontend3 for the support-team with a special web to admin the normal users). So all "logic" is "in the core" and either one or other frontend project is consuming the same services, so an improvement in the Core, improves all the deploys without having to re-test every piece of frontend.

So... we are trying that the controllers NEVER access the doctrine objects, but acces a "modelling layer", so if ever the persistance layer changes, the controllers and twigs (ie: all the frontend) remains without a single change so we only have to re-test the core but not the frontend.

We are trying to make a MODEL in such a way that all access to DB in "encapsulated" so the controllers do NOT access the doctrine but to "services" that in turn use doctrine. Suppose we treat the objects "cars" and "people", then a controller can access a "cars_manager" service or a "people_manager" service from which to do ALL necessary operations (create objects, retrieve them, etc).

Where would you put the flush call?

Example (in pseudo-code, to make it simpler to read):

controller AjaxJsonAddDriverToCar( $CarId, $DriverId )
{
    try
    {
        $Cars = getService( "core.cars_manager" );
        $Car = $Cars->getCarById( $CarId );
        $Car->addDriver( $DriverId );
        $Result = JSON_OK;
    }
    catch
    {
        $Result = JSON_FAIL;
    }

    return $Result;
}

Provided that the controller does NOT know how the core is implemented... it should NOT get the doctrine and perform a ->flush() on it.

Inspiration is welcome. Thanks.

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2 Answers

To avoid calling flush from the controller, I suggest encapsulating all the code that updates the database for a particular controller action into a service method which calls flush() at the end, in which case flush() won't be called if the service method throws an exception.

In the example you have given this can be accomplished by replacing:

    $Cars = getService( "core.cars_manager" );
    $Car = $Cars->getCarById( $CarId );
    $Car->addDriver( $DriverId );
    $Result = JSON_OK;

with:

    $Cars = getService( "core.cars_manager" );
    $Cars->addDriverToCar($CarId, $DriverId);
    $Result = JSON_OK;

and CarsManager::addDriverToCar would be something like:

    $Car = $this->getCarById( $CarId );
    $Car->addDriver( $DriverId );
    $this->getEntityManager()->flush();

However, this is a fairly simplistic example as it only updates a single Entity and the beauty of flush is that it saves changes to all the entities you have added/removed/updated, constituting the completion of a unit of work.

The approach you described mentions managers which are entity specific. Whilst there is no reason that the manager for a complex entity can't have methods that create/update/remove multiple entities of various types it is worth considering the responsibilities of your manager classes. It may be helpful to have a manager for each entity type that handles simple Find and CRUD type operations for that entity and then an additional layer of managers between the entity managers and the controllers that handle the processing for a particular feature or set of features.

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My first thought was some kind of active record, where you would tell the car to save itself. As Car is only boilerplate code, it could be ok that it knows about the database implementation and accesses some services.

My second thought was that the cars manager should know about the saving, so it would be something very similar to the entity manager and you woudl tell him flush and he flushes. You would basically abstract the entity manager and make him a bit easier to use (as there is no repository which one uses directly).

My third thought was wtf. I understand that you want to seperate the frontend from the backend. I don't understand why the frontend cannot operate on models but needs to operate on boilerplate code. The funny thing is: If the models change, so do your layers in between. If you don't want to change the layer, you could also not change the model (it's the same either way). E.g. you want to remove a field from the database: Remvoe the annotation and ignore it. No harm done. If you rename it, you can always have the old getter and setter in place, operating on the new name. And so on.

Of course I don't see the whole picture, but you may want to think this through again ;)

And here is another thought: Maybe you want to just tell the abstraction layer if the whole thing was a success or failure and he does everything what needs to be done (flushing the database, writing logs, sending emails and so on). If you can narrow your use cases down to success and failure and the service knows what to do, then this might be the easiest solution.

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