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My app has a certain piece of functionality that will only work on a device where root is available. Rather than having this feature fail when it is used (and then show an appropriate error message to the user), I'd prefer an ability to silently check if root is available first, and if not,hide the respective options in the first place.

Is there a way to do this?

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4  
There is no reliable way to do so; the answers below check common characteristics but a given device may not be rooted in a common way. If checking for root becomes prevalent, root solutions will probably start going to an effort to hide themselves. Since they can modify operating system behavior they have plenty of options for doing so. –  Chris Stratton Aug 13 '12 at 13:47

13 Answers 13

Here is a class that will check for Root one of three ways.

/** @author Kevin Kowalewski */
public class Root {

    private static String LOG_TAG = Root.class.getName();

    public boolean isDeviceRooted() {
        return checkRootMethod1() || checkRootMethod2() || checkRootMethod3();
    }

    public boolean checkRootMethod1() {
        String buildTags = android.os.Build.TAGS;
        return buildTags != null && buildTags.contains("test-keys");
    }

    public boolean checkRootMethod2() {
        try {
            File file = new File("/system/app/Superuser.apk");
            return file.exists();
        } catch (Exception e) return false;
    }

    public boolean checkRootMethod3() {
        return new ExecShell().executeCommand(SHELL_CMD.check_su_binary)!=null;
    }
}   

/** @author Kevin Kowalewski */
public class ExecShell {

    private static String LOG_TAG = ExecShell.class.getName();

    public static enum SHELL_CMD {
        check_su_binary(new String[] { "/system/xbin/which", "su" });

        String[] command;

        SHELL_CMD(String[] command) {
            this.command = command;
        }
    }

    public ArrayList<String> executeCommand(SHELL_CMD shellCmd) {
        String line = null;
        ArrayList<String> fullResponse = new ArrayList<String>();
        Process localProcess = null;
        try {
            localProcess = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(shellCmd.command);
        } catch (Exception e) {
            return null;
        }
        BufferedWriter out = new BufferedWriter(new OutputStreamWriter(
                localProcess.getOutputStream()));
        BufferedReader in = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(
                localProcess.getInputStream()));
        try {
            while ((line = in.readLine()) != null) {
                Log.d(LOG_TAG, "--> Line received: " + line);
                fullResponse.add(line);
            }
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        Log.d(LOG_TAG, "--> Full response was: " + fullResponse);
        return fullResponse;
    }
}
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3  
If a two questions warrant identical answers then they are 99% of the time duplicates, so flag as dupes instead of posting the same answer on both. Thanks. –  Kev Nov 11 '11 at 23:27
    
Its not 100% identical. The answer I provided contains code to actually attempt rooted commands, that would not prompt a Super User request to the user. Checking for test-keys does not work on all rooted devices (didn't work on mine). Testing for SuperUser.apk is also not perfect, users can uninstall it after gaining root. –  Kevin Nov 14 '11 at 19:08
2  
That may be so, however I am just letting you know that exact duplicate answers are flagged by the community. You should tailor your answers and address the specifics of the OP's problem. Copy and paste answers are at risk from attracting downvotes. –  Kev Nov 14 '11 at 19:30
    
Thanks for the heads up, there is no reason why I would post an exact duplicate. My answer also includes code on how the Execute shell commands, which is useful in determining if the device running root. –  Kevin Nov 15 '11 at 19:14
6  
Just wanted to let you know, the Fox Digital Copy (Beta) app uses your code nearly verbatim, including the Root and ExecShell classes, as well as the checkRootMethod1/2/3 methods. Found it highly amusing. –  Matt Joseph Dec 15 '13 at 23:35

The RootTools library offers simple methods to check for root:

RootTools.isRootAvailable()

http://code.google.com/p/roottools/

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6  
isRootAvailable() just checks for the existence of su in the path and some other hard-coded directories. I've heard that some unrooting tools will leave su there, so this will give a false positive. –  Bob Whiteman Nov 2 '11 at 19:24
8  
RootTools.isAccessGiven() will not only check for root, but also request root permission; so an unrooted device will always return false with this method. –  aggregate1166877 Apr 17 '13 at 9:40
1  
@aggregate1166877, you are right, but it is not good enough, what if I don't require root permission when I ask? I just want to know if it is rooted, but I don't need root permission at the moment. –  neevek Jun 27 '13 at 6:46
1  
isAccessGiven() returns false when the user denies the permission even though the device was a rooted one. –  subi Apr 16 at 9:38

In my application I was checking if device is rooted or not by executing "su" command. But today I've removed this part of my code. Why?

Because my application became a memory killer. How? Let me tell you my story.

There were some complaints that my application was slowing down devices(Of course I thought that can not be true). I tried to figure out why. So I used MAT to get heap dumps and analyze, and everything seemed perfect. But after relaunching my app many times I realized that device is really getting slower and stopping my application didn't make it faster (unless I restart device). I analyzed dump files again while device is very slow. But everything was still perfect for dump file. Then I did what must be done at first. I listed processes.

$ adb shell ps

Surprize; there were many processes for my application (with my application's process tag at manifest). Some of them was zombie some of them not.

With a sample application which has a single Activity and executes just "su" command, I realized that a zombie process is being created on every launch of application. At first these zombies allocate 0KB but than something happens and zombie processes are holding nearly same KBs as my application's main process and they became standart processes.

There is a bug report for same issue on bugs.sun.com: http://bugs.sun.com/view_bug.do?bug_id=6474073 this explains if command is not found zombies are going to be created with exec() method. But I still don't understand why and how can they become standart processes and hold significant KBs. (This is not happening all the time)

You can try if you want with code sample below;

String commandToExecute = "su";
executeShellCommand(commandToExecute);

Simple command execution method;

private boolean executeShellCommand(String command){
    Process process = null;            
    try{
        process = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(command);
        return true;
    } catch (Exception e) {
        return false;
    } finally{
        if(process != null){
            try{
                process.destroy();
            }catch (Exception e) {
            }
        }
    }
}

To sum up; I have no advice for you to determine if device is rooted or not. But if I were you I would not use Runtime.getRuntime().exec().

By the way; RootTools.isRootAvailable() causes same problem.

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5  
That is very worrisome. I had a rooted device detection class that did the same thing - after reading this I confirmed what aegean detailed above. Occasional zombie processes being left behind, device slowdowns, etc... –  AWT Sep 3 '13 at 13:49
1  
I confirm the problem with RootTools 3.4 on a GT-S5830i android 2.3.6. Most of the zombie got allocated memory and the problem is systematic. I need to restart the device after 3-4 test. I recommend to save the test result to shared preference. –  Christ May 27 at 8:03

Instead of using isRootAvailable() you can use isAccessGiven(). Direct from RootTools wiki:

if (RootTools.isAccessGiven()) {
    // your app has been granted root access
}

RootTools.isAccessGiven() not only checks that a device is rooted, it also calls su for your app, requests permission, and returns true if your app was successfully granted root permissions. This can be used as the first check in your app to make sure that you will be granted access when you need it.

https://code.google.com/p/roottools/

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Some modified builds used to set the system property ro.modversion for this purpose. Things seem to have moved on; my build from TheDude a few months ago has this:

cmb@apollo:~$ adb -d shell getprop |grep build
[ro.build.id]: [CUPCAKE]
[ro.build.display.id]: [htc_dream-eng 1.5 CUPCAKE eng.TheDudeAbides.20090427.235325 test-keys]
[ro.build.version.incremental]: [eng.TheDude.2009027.235325]
[ro.build.version.sdk]: [3]
[ro.build.version.release]: [1.5]
[ro.build.date]: [Mon Apr 20 01:42:32 CDT 2009]
[ro.build.date.utc]: [1240209752]
[ro.build.type]: [eng]
[ro.build.user]: [TheDude]
[ro.build.host]: [ender]
[ro.build.tags]: [test-keys]
[ro.build.product]: [dream]
[ro.build.description]: [kila-user 1.1 PLAT-RC33 126986 ota-rel-keys,release-keys]
[ro.build.fingerprint]: [tmobile/kila/dream/trout:1.1/PLAT-RC33/126986:user/ota-rel-keys,release-keys]
[ro.build.changelist]: [17615# end build properties]

The emulator from the 1.5 SDK on the other hand, running the 1.5 image, also has root, is probably similar to the Android Dev Phone 1 (which you presumably want to allow) and has this:

cmb@apollo:~$ adb -e shell getprop |grep build
[ro.build.id]: [CUPCAKE]
[ro.build.display.id]: [sdk-eng 1.5 CUPCAKE 148875 test-keys]
[ro.build.version.incremental]: [148875]
[ro.build.version.sdk]: [3]
[ro.build.version.release]: [1.5]
[ro.build.date]: [Thu May 14 18:09:10 PDT 2009]
[ro.build.date.utc]: [1242349750]
[ro.build.type]: [eng]
[ro.build.user]: [android-build]
[ro.build.host]: [undroid16.mtv.corp.google.com]
[ro.build.tags]: [test-keys]
[ro.build.product]: [generic]
[ro.build.description]: [sdk-eng 1.5 CUPCAKE 148875 test-keys]
[ro.build.fingerprint]: [generic/sdk/generic/:1.5/CUPCAKE/148875:eng/test-keys]

As for the retail builds, I don't have one to hand, but various searches under site:xda-developers.com are informative. Here is a G1 in the Netherlands, you can see that ro.build.tags does not have test-keys, and I think that's probably the most reliable property to use.

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That looks interesting, but: While the emulator (and ADP) do allow root per se, they don't allow applications to use it, i.e.: $ su app_29 $ su su: uid 10029 not allowed to su –  miracle2k Jul 9 '09 at 10:08
    
Ah, I suppose they wouldn't... you could combine it with a check for ro.build.host (not) ending in google.com then, if they're the only ones that have test-keys but block su without asking the user. Depends what the build host is for newer devices, things that aren't phones... not easy. –  Chris Boyle Jul 9 '09 at 10:27

http://code.google.com/p/roottools/

If you do not want to use the jar file just use the code:

public static boolean findBinary(String binaryName) {
        boolean found = false;
        if (!found) {
            String[] places = { "/sbin/", "/system/bin/", "/system/xbin/",
                    "/data/local/xbin/", "/data/local/bin/",
                    "/system/sd/xbin/", "/system/bin/failsafe/", "/data/local/" };
            for (String where : places) {
                if (new File(where + binaryName).exists()) {
                    found = true;

                    break;
                }
            }
        }
        return found;
    }

Program will try to find su folder:

private static boolean isRooted() {
        return findBinary("su");
    }

Example:

if (isRooted() == true ){
textView.setText("Device Rooted");

}
else{
textView.setText("Device Unrooted");
}
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Two additional ideas, if you want to check if a device is root capable from your app:

  1. Check for the existing of the 'su' binary: run "which su" from Runtime.getRuntime().exec()
  2. Look for the SuperUser.apk in /system/app/Superuser.apk location
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Try writing a file to /data — it's one of the few writable file systems on the device, and that particular path can only be written to by root.

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3  
This isn't a good test as your application can't write to the directory using a java File object, and the file write test is done from an elevated shell. –  Kevin Nov 11 '11 at 15:48

Here is my code based on some answers here:

 /**
   * Checks if the phone is rooted.
   * 
   * @return <code>true</code> if the phone is rooted, <code>false</code>
   * otherwise.
   */
  public static boolean isPhoneRooted() {

    // get from build info
    String buildTags = android.os.Build.TAGS;
    if (buildTags != null && buildTags.contains("test-keys")) {
      return true;
    }

    // check if /system/app/Superuser.apk is present
    try {
      File file = new File("/system/app/Superuser.apk");
      if (file.exists()) {
        return true;
      }
    } catch (Throwable e1) {
      // ignore
    }

    return false;
  }
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Further to @Kevins answer, I've recently found while using his system, that the Nexus 7.1 was returning false for all three methods - No which command, no test-keys and SuperSU was not installed in /system/app.

I added this:

public static boolean checkRootMethod4(Context context) {
    return isPackageInstalled("eu.chainfire.supersu", context);     
}

private static boolean isPackageInstalled(String packagename, Context context) {
    PackageManager pm = context.getPackageManager();
    try {
        pm.getPackageInfo(packagename, PackageManager.GET_ACTIVITIES);
        return true;
    } catch (NameNotFoundException e) {
        return false;
    }
}

This is slightly less useful in some situations (if you need guaranteed root access) as it's completely possible for SuperSU to be installed on devices which don't have SU access.

However, since it's possible to have SuperSU installed and working but not in the /system/app directory, this extra case will root (haha) out such cases.

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Indeed it is interesting question and so far nobody has deserved award. I use the following code:

  boolean isRooted() {
      try {
                ServerSocket ss = new ServerSocket(81);
                ss.close();
                                    return true;
            } catch (Exception e) {
                // not sure
            }
    return false;
  }

The code is certainly not bulletproof, because network can be not available so you get an exception. If this method returns true then 99% you can be sure, otherwise just 50% that not. Networking permission can also spoil the solution.

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I tested this and it does not return true with my rooted device. –  tricknology Oct 6 at 21:26
    
It is interesting to see what kind of exception you get. You may get port already bound exception, however if you can't create server port in range under 1024, it decreases a value of rooting, since still you have certain limitations. –  Dmitriy R Oct 7 at 0:20

Using my library at rootbox, it is pretty easy. Check the required code below:

    //Pass true to <Shell>.start(...) call to run as superuser
    Shell shell = null;
    try {
            shell = Shell.start(true);
    } catch (IOException exception) {
            exception.printStackTrace();
    }
    if (shell == null)
            // We failed to execute su binary
            return;
    if (shell.isRoot()) {
            // Verified running as uid 0 (root), can continue with commands
            ...
    } else
            throw Exception("Unable to gain root access. Make sure you pressed Allow/Grant in superuser prompt.");
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    public static boolean isRootAvailable(){
            Process p = null;
            try{
               p = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(new String[] {"su"});
               writeCommandToConsole(p,"exit 0");
               int result = p.waitFor();
               if(result != 0)
                   throw new Exception("Root check result with exit command " + result);
               return true;
            } catch (IOException e) {
                Log.e(LOG_TAG, "Su executable is not available ", e);
            } catch (Exception e) {
                Log.e(LOG_TAG, "Root is unavailable ", e);
            }finally {
                if(p != null)
                    p.destroy();
            }
            return false;
        }
 private static String writeCommandToConsole(Process proc, String command, boolean ignoreError) throws Exception{
            byte[] tmpArray = new byte[1024];
            proc.getOutputStream().write((command + "\n").getBytes());
            proc.getOutputStream().flush();
            int bytesRead = 0;
            if(proc.getErrorStream().available() > 0){
                if((bytesRead = proc.getErrorStream().read(tmpArray)) > 1){
                    Log.e(LOG_TAG,new String(tmpArray,0,bytesRead));
                    if(!ignoreError)
                        throw new Exception(new String(tmpArray,0,bytesRead));
                }
            }
            if(proc.getInputStream().available() > 0){
                bytesRead = proc.getInputStream().read(tmpArray);
                Log.i(LOG_TAG, new String(tmpArray,0,bytesRead));
            }
            return new String(tmpArray);
        }
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