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I am programming a C++ extension for Python and I am using distutils to compile the project. As the project grows, rebuilding it takes longer and longer. Is there a way to speed up the build process?

I read that parallel builds (as with make -j) are not possible with distutils. Are there any good alternatives to distutils which might be faster?

I also noticed that it's recompiling all object files every time I call python setup.py build, even when I only changed one source file. Should this be the case or might I be doing something wrong here?

In case it helps, here are some of the files which I try to compile: https://gist.github.com/2923577

Thanks!

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1  
How is your build process? Do you always clean/rebuild? How is your code (specially headers)? Are you using forward declarations? What is your environment? Can you use precompiled headers? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 13 '12 at 11:28
    
I didn't know how to answer all of your questions, so I added a link to part of the source code. I am building the project with python setup.py build, is there a better way or better command? The environments are linux and Mac. –  Lucas Jun 13 '12 at 11:49
1  
Recompiling all object files is expected: Extension extra options may change the output without changing the .c file. bugs.python.org/issue5372 –  Éric Araujo Feb 17 '13 at 22:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted
  1. Try building with environment variable CC="ccache gcc", that will speed up build significantly when the source has not changed. (strangely, distutils uses CC also for c++ source files). Install the ccache package, of course.

  2. Since you have a single extension which is assembled from multiple compiled object files, you can monkey-patch distutils to compile those in parallel (they are independent) - put this into your setup.py (adjust the N=2 as you wish):

    # monkey-patch for parallel compilation
    def parallelCCompile(self, sources, output_dir=None, macros=None, include_dirs=None, debug=0, extra_preargs=None, extra_postargs=None, depends=None):
        # those lines are copied from distutils.ccompiler.CCompiler directly
        macros, objects, extra_postargs, pp_opts, build = self._setup_compile(output_dir, macros, include_dirs, sources, depends, extra_postargs)
        cc_args = self._get_cc_args(pp_opts, debug, extra_preargs)
        # parallel code
        N=2 # number of parallel compilations
        import multiprocessing.pool
        def _single_compile(obj):
            try: src, ext = build[obj]
            except KeyError: return
            self._compile(obj, src, ext, cc_args, extra_postargs, pp_opts)
        # convert to list, imap is evaluated on-demand
        list(multiprocessing.pool.ThreadPool(N).imap(_single_compile,objects))
        return objects
    import distutils.ccompiler
    distutils.ccompiler.CCompiler.compile=parallelCCompile
    
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The monkey patch works great! Thanks. –  Lucas Nov 9 '12 at 15:43
    
Great monkey-patch! +1. To help when debugging, I also added a try block around the imap() iteration, to catch CompileError's, only raising them after terminating / joining the ThreadPool. That way I can still easily see the exact compile command that failed at the bottom of the output, whilst not orphaning any processes. –  Alex Leach Mar 6 '13 at 18:03
1  
Has anybody been successful with the monkey-patch on windows? I have tried it but it looks like it skips building the objects and jumps straight to the link step! –  Nick Aug 22 '13 at 16:07

In the limited examples you provided in the link, it seems fairly obvious that you have some misunderstanding on what some of the features of the language are. For example, the gsminterface.h has a whole lot of namespace level statics, which is probably unintended. Every translation unit that includes that header will compile it's own version for everyone of the symbols declared in that header. Side effects of this are not only the compile time but also code bloat (larger binaries) and link time as the linker needs to process all those symbols.

There are still many questions that affect the build process that you have not answered, for example, whether you clean every time before you recompile. If you are doing that, then you might want to consider ccache, which is a tool that caches the result of the build process, so that if you run make clean; make target only the preprocessor will be run for any translation unit that has not changed. Note that as long as you keep maintaining most code in headers, this will not offer much of an advantage, as a change in a header modifies all translation units that include it. (I don't know your build system, so I cannot tell you whether python setup.py build will clean or not)

The project does not seem large otherwise, so I would be surprised if it took more than a few seconds to compile.

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I followed the tutorial and API documentation at docs.python.org/extending/extending.html, which also uses static a lot. I don't explicitly clean the build (i.e., I don't call python setup.py clean) and it doesn't seem as if simply invoking python setup.py build performs a clean before rebuilding, although I am not sure what it does. And you're right, the build only takes about 40s. But if it would only take 10s, I would be happier. –  Lucas Jun 13 '12 at 12:19
1  
@Lucas: The tutorial might be referring to functions defined in a single translation unit, not a header. Namespace level static symbols in a header make no sense. Just declare the function (without static) and define them in a single translation unit (again, no static). That will reduce the number of translation units to recompile when you only change implementations, and the cost of recompiling when the header also changes. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 13 '12 at 12:23
    
@dribeas: Thanks, I reorganized the code and although it didn't speed up the build process (all translation units still always get recompiled), I think the code makes much more sense now. –  Lucas Jun 13 '12 at 15:53

I've got this working on Windows with clcache, derived from eudoxos's answer:

# Python modules
import datetime
import distutils
import distutils.ccompiler
import distutils.sysconfig
import multiprocessing
import multiprocessing.pool
import os
import sys

from distutils.core import setup
from distutils.core import Extension
from distutils.errors import CompileError
from distutils.errors import DistutilsExecError

now = datetime.datetime.now

ON_LINUX = "linux" in sys.platform

N_JOBS = 4

#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
# Enable ccache to speed up builds

if ON_LINUX:
    os.environ['CC'] = 'ccache gcc'

# Windows
else:

    # Using clcache.exe, see: https://github.com/frerich/clcache

    # Insert path to clcache.exe into the path.

    prefix = os.path.dirname(os.path.abspath(__file__))
    path = os.path.join(prefix, "bin")

    print "Adding %s to the system path." % path
    os.environ['PATH'] = '%s;%s' % (path, os.environ['PATH'])

    clcache_exe = os.path.join(path, "clcache.exe")

#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
# Parallel Compile
#
# Reference:
#
# http://stackoverflow.com/questions/11013851/speeding-up-build-process-with-distutils
#

def linux_parallel_cpp_compile(
        self,
        sources,
        output_dir=None,
        macros=None,
        include_dirs=None,
        debug=0,
        extra_preargs=None,
        extra_postargs=None,
        depends=None):

    # Copied from distutils.ccompiler.CCompiler

    macros, objects, extra_postargs, pp_opts, build = self._setup_compile(
        output_dir, macros, include_dirs, sources, depends, extra_postargs)

    cc_args = self._get_cc_args(pp_opts, debug, extra_preargs)

    def _single_compile(obj):

        try:
            src, ext = build[obj]
        except KeyError:
            return

        self._compile(obj, src, ext, cc_args, extra_postargs, pp_opts)

    # convert to list, imap is evaluated on-demand

    list(multiprocessing.pool.ThreadPool(N_JOBS).imap(
        _single_compile, objects))

    return objects


def windows_parallel_cpp_compile(
        self,
        sources,
        output_dir=None,
        macros=None,
        include_dirs=None,
        debug=0,
        extra_preargs=None,
        extra_postargs=None,
        depends=None):

    # Copied from distutils.msvc9compiler.MSVCCompiler

    if not self.initialized:
        self.initialize()

    macros, objects, extra_postargs, pp_opts, build = self._setup_compile(
        output_dir, macros, include_dirs, sources, depends, extra_postargs)

    compile_opts = extra_preargs or []
    compile_opts.append('/c')

    if debug:
        compile_opts.extend(self.compile_options_debug)
    else:
        compile_opts.extend(self.compile_options)

    def _single_compile(obj):

        try:
            src, ext = build[obj]
        except KeyError:
            return

        input_opt = "/Tp" + src
        output_opt = "/Fo" + obj
        try:
            self.spawn(
                [clcache_exe]
                + compile_opts
                + pp_opts
                + [input_opt, output_opt]
                + extra_postargs)

        except DistutilsExecError, msg:
            raise CompileError(msg)

    # convert to list, imap is evaluated on-demand

    list(multiprocessing.pool.ThreadPool(N_JOBS).imap(
        _single_compile, objects))

    return objects

#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
# Only enable parallel compile on 2.7 Python

if sys.version_info[1] == 7:

    if ON_LINUX:
        distutils.ccompiler.CCompiler.compile = linux_parallel_cpp_compile

    else:
        import distutils.msvccompiler
        import distutils.msvc9compiler

        distutils.msvccompiler.MSVCCompiler.compile = windows_parallel_cpp_compile
        distutils.msvc9compiler.MSVCCompiler.compile = windows_parallel_cpp_compile

# ... call setup() as usual
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