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How can I test whether functor is a callable object which takes a reference to an int and returns a bool?

template<typename functor>
void foo(functor f)
{
    static_assert('functor == bool (int&)', "error message");

    int x = -1;
    if (f(x))
        std::cout << x << std::endl;
}

bool bar(int& x)
{
    x = 4711;
    return true;
}

struct other
{
    bool operator()(int& x)
    {
        x = 815;
        return true;
    }
};
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1  
Do you have a c++11 compiler available? Can you use boost type traits library? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 13 '12 at 12:15
1  
Do you want to distinguish between a other::operator() and bar() ? Or you just want to know whether functor f is of type bool(int&) ? –  iammilind Jun 13 '12 at 12:15
    
Do you mean something like this: ideone.com/22Llh (copy-and-hacked from wikipedia)? –  Vlad Jun 13 '12 at 12:45

3 Answers 3

Looks to me like you don't really want to check the signature of a functor, you want to restrict what the user can pass in, in the first place:

If you have access to std::function you can do this:

void foo(const std::function<bool(int&)>& f)
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I assume that C++11 solutions are not precluded.

I will assume too that the OP was correct in believing he wished to detect functions or functors having a signature bool(int &). The use of std::function, as suggested by Dave:

void foo(const std::function<bool(int&)>& f);

will indeed ensure that any argument acceptable as f contains a unary-function-like object whose argument is of a type that can bind to int& and whose return type is implicitly convertible to bool. But:

double bar(bool b) {
    return b ? DBL_MAX : DBL_MIN;
}

is such an object, and it seems far-fetched to reckon it a "callable object which takes a reference to an int and returns a bool."

The fact that we wish to test both functions and objects of class type implies that a SFINAE class template in the vein:

template<typename T>
struct is_predicate_of_ref_to_int_type { ... };

will not quite fit the bill by itelf, for although we can instantiate with typename T a functor type, we cannot instantiate with typename T a function.

For a function func we should have to instantiate with T = decltype(func); but the asymmetry persists because for a functor type Functor we cannot instantiate with T = decltype(Functor), as Functor is not an expression.

Such a SFINAE class template will serve the purpose once we have obtained the type of the object in question, but to get that far with a uniform idiom we can use an overloaded function, whose argument may equally be a function or a functor object. Here is such a solution, with a test program appended:

#include <type_traits>

template<class T>
struct is_predicate_of_ref_to_int_type {
    // SFINAE operator-has-correct-sig- :)
    template<class A>
    static auto test(bool (A::*)(int &)) -> std::true_type;

    // SFINAE operator-exists :)
    template <class A> 
    static auto test(decltype(&A::operator()),void *) ->
        // So the operator exists. Has it the correct sig? 
        decltype(test(&A::operator()));

    // SFINAE failure :(
    template<class A>
    static auto test(...) -> std::false_type;

    // This will be either `std::true_type` or `std::false_type`
    typedef decltype(test<T>(0,0)) type;

    static const bool value = type::value;

};

template<typename T>
bool is_predicate_of_ref_to_int(T const & t) {
    return is_predicate_of_ref_to_int_type<T>::value;
}

bool is_predicate_of_ref_to_int(bool (function)(int &)) {
    return true;
}

// Testing...

struct passing_class_0
{
    bool operator()(int & i) {
        return i > 0;
    }
};

struct failing_class_0
{
    bool operator()(int i) {
        return i > 0;
    }
};

struct failing_class_1
{
    bool operator()(int & i, int & j) {
        return i > j;
    }
}   

struct failing_class_2{};


bool passing_function_0(int & i) {
    return i > 0;
}

bool failing_function_0(int i) {
    return i > 0;
}

int failing_function_1(int & i) {
    return i;
}

void failing_function_2(){}

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;


int main()
{
    passing_class_0 pc0;
    failing_class_0 fc0;
    failing_class_1 fc1;
    failing_class_2 fc2;

    cout << "Expecting pass..." << endl;
    cout << is_predicate_of_ref_to_int(pc0) << endl;
    cout << is_predicate_of_ref_to_int(passing_function_0) << endl;
    cout << "Expecting fail..." << endl;
    cout << is_predicate_of_ref_to_int(fc0) << endl;
    cout << is_predicate_of_ref_to_int(fc1) << endl;
    cout << is_predicate_of_ref_to_int(fc2) << endl;
    cout << is_predicate_of_ref_to_int(failing_function_0) << endl;
    cout << is_predicate_of_ref_to_int(failing_function_1) << endl;
    cout << is_predicate_of_ref_to_int(failing_function_2) << endl;
    cout << is_predicate_of_ref_to_int(failing_function_2) << endl;
    cout << is_predicate_of_ref_to_int(1L) << endl; 
    return 0; 
}

Built with GCC 4.7.2 or clang 3.2, this has the expected outputs.

There is a caveat. Any functor type that overloads operator() will fail the test, e.g.

struct bar
{
    bool operator()(int & i) { ... }
    bool operator()(int & i, int & j) { ... }
};

even if one of the overloads is satisfactory, due to the Standard's limitations upon taking the address of an overloaded member function.

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If your compiler supports it, you could use the header <type_traits> and is_function.

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