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I have followed the steps for resizing an EC2 volume

  1. Stopped the instance
  2. Took a snapshot of the current volume
  3. Created a new volume out of the previous snapshot with a bigger size in the same region
  4. Deattached the old volume from the instance
  5. Attached the new volume to the instance at the same mount point

Old volume was 5GB and the one I created is 100GB Now, when i restart the instance and run df -h I still see this

Filesystem            Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/xvde1            4.7G  3.5G 1021M  78% /
tmpfs                 296M     0  296M   0% /dev/shm

This is what I get when running

sudo resize2fs /dev/xvde1

The filesystem is already 1247037 blocks long.  Nothing to do!

If I run cat /proc/partitions I see

 202       64  104857600 xvde
 202       65    4988151 xvde1
 202       66     249007 xvde2

From what I understand if I have followed the right steps xvde should have the same data as xvde1 but I don't know how to use it

How can I use the new volume or umount xvde1 and mount xvde instead?

I cannot understand what I am doing wrong

I also tried sudo ifs_growfs /dev/xvde1

xfs_growfs: /dev/xvde1 is not a mounted XFS filesystem

Btw, this a linux box with centos 6.2 x86_64

Thanks in advance for your help

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6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Thank you Wilman your commands worked correctly, small improvement need to be considered if we are increasing EBSs into larger sizes

  1. Stop the instance
  2. Create a snapshot from the volume
  3. Create a new volume based on the snapshot increasing the size
  4. Check and remember the current's volume mount point (i.e. /dev/sda1)
  5. Detach current volume
  6. Attach the recently created volume to the instance, setting the exact mount point
  7. Restart the instance
  8. Access via SSH to the instance and run fdisk /dev/xvde

    WARNING: DOS-compatible mode is deprecated. It's strongly recommended to switch off the mode (command 'c') and change display units to sectors (command 'u')

  9. Hit p to show current partitions

  10. Hit d to delete current partitions (if there are more than one, you have to delete one at a time) NOTE: Don't worry data is not lost
  11. Hit n to create a new partition
  12. Hit p to set it as primary
  13. Hit 1 to set the first cylinder
  14. Set the desired new space (if empty the whole space is reserved)
  15. Hit a to make it bootable
  16. Hit 1 and w to write changes
  17. Reboot instance
  18. Log via SSH and run resize2fs /dev/xvde1
  19. Finally check the new space running df -h
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"WARNING: DOS-compatible mode is deprecated. It's strongly recommended to switch off the mode (command 'c') and change display units to sectors (command 'u')" This was not necessary for me (Ubuntu 13.04). It had already switched off DOS compatibility and used Sectors by default. Pressing c and u actually switched TO the deprecated modes. –  wisbucky Oct 22 '13 at 0:04
    
The solution worked brilliant but the instance was stuck on "1/2 checks passed" with an exclamation sign (ReadHat 6.5). To fix this I have set the "first cylinder" to 16 (like was previously). After that the instance started normal with "2/2 checks passed". Hope this helps someone... –  user3586516 Apr 29 at 18:23

[SOLVED]

This is what it had to be done

  1. Stop the instance
  2. Create a snapshot from the volume
  3. Create a new volume based on the snapshot increasing the size
  4. Check and remember the current's volume mount point (i.e. /dev/sda1)
  5. Detach current volume
  6. Attach the recently created volume to the instance, setting the exact mount point
  7. Restart the instance
  8. Access via SSH to the instance and run fdisk /dev/xvde
  9. Hit p to show current partitions
  10. Hit d to delete current partitions (if there are more than one, you have to delete one at a time) NOTE: Don't worry data is not lost
  11. Hit n to create a new partition
  12. Hit p to set it as primary
  13. Hit 1 to set the first cylinder
  14. Set the desired new space (if empty the whole space is reserved)
  15. Hit a to make it bootable
  16. Hit 1 and w to write changes
  17. Reboot instance
  18. Log via SSH and run resize2fs /dev/xvde1
  19. Finally check the new space running df -h

This is it

Good luck!

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In Amazon EBS volumes it seems to be important to use the same mount point in resize2fs as you use with fdisk. df shows up something like /dev/xvda1 as the attached EBS volume, but the resize2fs command only worked for me when I used the /dev/sdf1 identifier, which I had used when I did the new partition in fdisk. –  Garreth McDaid Feb 5 at 17:26

Did you make a partition on this volume? If you did, you will need to grow the partition first.

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no I did not. Should I?How do I do that? Remember this new volume I have attached is supposed to have all the previous data because it is a snapshot of the original volume –  Wilman Arambillete Jun 13 '12 at 16:00
    
No. But I have gotten that error if there was a partition attached. Go and double check you made the volume the correct size, and double check you mounted the new volume. –  chantheman Jun 13 '12 at 17:06
    
Also, you don't have to stop the instance to do this. It is safe to if you have writes on that volume, but you can snapshot it with the instance running. –  chantheman Jun 13 '12 at 17:06

This will work for xfs file system just run this command

xfs_growfs /
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Bootable flag (a) didn't worked in my case (EC2, centos6.5), so i had to re-create volume from snapshot. After repeating all steps EXCEPT bootable flag - everything worked flawlessly so i was able to resize2fs after. Thank you!

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Followed the steps here, but it left me with a corrupted volume. What finally worked for me is described here. Critical piece is to attach the disk being expanded to a second instance so you manipulate the partition without affecting the running instance. Once expanded, you re-attach the disk to the original instance and terminate the second instance.

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