Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a similar, but different, question like How to redirect Powershell output from a script run by TaskScheduler and override default width of 80 characters.

I have a custom installer framework written long ago. Within it I can execute "tasks". I recently had to add a task to execute a PowerShell script. Now, even though the task is written in C#, I cannot invoke the commands in the PowerShell script directly. That, unfortunately, is off the table.

In short, I want to invoke a PowerShell executable from C# and redirect its output back to my application. Here's what I've done so far:

I can successfully invoke PowerShell using the following code (from a test project I created):

  string powerShellExeLocation = null;

  RegistryKey localKey = Registry.LocalMachine;

  RegistryKey subKey = localKey.OpenSubKey(@"SOFTWARE\Microsoft\PowerShell\1\PowerShellEngine");
  powerShellExeLocation = subKey.GetValue("ApplicationBase").ToString();

  if (!Directory.Exists(powerShellExeLocation))
    throw new Exception("Cannot locate the PowerShell dir.");

  powerShellExeLocation = Path.Combine(powerShellExeLocation, "powershell.exe");

  if (!File.Exists(powerShellExeLocation))
    throw new Exception("Cannot locate the PowerShell executable.");

  string scriptLocation = Path.Combine(Environment.CurrentDirectory, "PowerShellScript.ps1");

  if (!File.Exists(scriptLocation))
    throw new Exception("Cannot locate the PowerShell script.");

  ProcessStartInfo processInfo = new ProcessStartInfo();
  processInfo.Verb = "runas";
  processInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
  processInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
  processInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
  processInfo.WorkingDirectory = Environment.CurrentDirectory;

  processInfo.FileName = powerShellExeLocation;
  processInfo.Arguments = "-NoLogo -OutputFormat Text -NonInteractive -WindowStyle Hidden -ExecutionPolicy Unrestricted -File \"" + scriptLocation + "\" ";

  Process powerShellProcess = new Process();
  powerShellProcess.StartInfo = processInfo;
  powerShellProcess.OutputDataReceived += new DataReceivedEventHandler(powerShellProcess_OutputDataReceived);
  powerShellProcess.ErrorDataReceived += new DataReceivedEventHandler(powerShellProcess_ErrorDataReceived);

  powerShellProcess.Start();

  while (!powerShellProcess.HasExited)
  {
    Thread.Sleep(500);
  }

My handlers for the redirected output are never called:

void powerShellProcess_ErrorDataReceived(object sender, DataReceivedEventArgs e)

and

void powerShellProcess_OutputDataReceived(object sender, DataReceivedEventArgs e)

I am fairly confident that the script is running. Right now I just have a test script that is outputting the PATH contents.

$a = $env:path; $a.Split(";")

I tested this from within a PowerShell instance and it outputs correctly.

What can I do to get the PowerShell output to redirect to my C# code? I don't want to rely on the scripts that I will execute to handle their own logging. I'd rather gather their output and handle it within the framework's logging mechanism.

EDIT Realized I left the odd loop thing to wait for exit in that code example. I've had the process "WaitForExit":

powerShellProcess.WaitForExit();

EDIT
Using the suggestion from @MiniBill. I came up with the following code snippit:

powerShellProcess.Start();
while (!powerShellProcess.HasExited)
{
  string line;
  while (!string.IsNullOrEmpty((line = powerShellProcess.StandardOutput.ReadLine())))
    this.LogInfo("PowerShell running: " + line);
}

This handles the output fine. It's cutting my lines at 80 characters :(, but I can live with that unless someone else can provide a suggestion to fix that!

UPDATE A Solution

/*
  * The next few lines define the process start info for the PowerShell executable.
  */
ProcessStartInfo processInfo = new ProcessStartInfo();
processInfo.Verb = "runas";
processInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
processInfo.RedirectStandardError = true;
processInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
processInfo.WorkingDirectory = Environment.CurrentDirectory;

//this FileName was retrieved earlier by looking in the registry for key "HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\PowerShell\1\PowerShellEngine" and the value for "ApplicationBase"
processInfo.FileName = powerShellExeLocation;

//if we're going to use script arguments build up the arguments from the process start correctly.
if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(this.ScriptArguments))
  processInfo.Arguments = "-NoLogo -NonInteractive -WindowStyle Hidden -ExecutionPolicy Unrestricted -File \"" + ScriptLocation + "\" '" + ScriptArguments + "'";
else
  processInfo.Arguments = "-NoLogo -NonInteractive -WindowStyle Hidden -ExecutionPolicy Unrestricted -File \"" + ScriptLocation + "\"";

//create the Process object, set the start info, and start the process
Process powerShellProcess = new Process();
powerShellProcess.StartInfo = processInfo;

powerShellProcess.Start();

/*
  * While the PowerShell process hasn't exited do the following:
  * 
  * Read from the current position of the StandardOutput to the end by each line and
  * update the tasks progress with this information
  * 
  * Read from the current position of StandardError to the end by each line, update
  * the task's progress with this information and set that we have an error.
  * 
  * Sleep for 250 milliseconds (1/4 of a sec)
  */
bool isError = false;
while (!powerShellProcess.HasExited)
{
  string standardOuputLine, standardErrorLine;
  while (!string.IsNullOrEmpty((standardOuputLine = powerShellProcess.StandardOutput.ReadLine())))
  {
    this.UpdateTaskProgress(standardOuputLine);
  }


  while (!string.IsNullOrEmpty((standardErrorLine = powerShellProcess.StandardError.ReadLine())))
  {
    this.UpdateTaskProgress(standardErrorLine);
    isError = true;
  }

  Thread.Sleep(250);
}

/*
  * Now that the process has completed read to the end of StandardOutput and StandardError.
  * Update the task progress with this information.
  */

string finalStdOuputLine = powerShellProcess.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd();
string finalStdErrorLine = powerShellProcess.StandardError.ReadToEnd();

if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(finalStdOuputLine))
  this.UpdateTaskProgress(finalStdOuputLine);

if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(finalStdErrorLine))
{
  this.UpdateTaskProgress(finalStdErrorLine);
  isError = true;
}

// there was an error during the run of PowerShell that was output to StandardError.  This doesn't necessarily mean that
// the script error'd but there was a problem.  Throw an exception for this.
if (isError)
  throw new Exception(string.Format(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, "Error during the execution of {0}.", this.ScriptLocation));
share|improve this question
    
$Host.UI.RawUI has a BufferSize and WindowSize property that might still work even if it's not writing to any visible thing. –  Shibumi Jun 18 '12 at 13:26
    
@Kiquenet I've provided my solution that I use in my "Task" structure which invokes the PowerShell executable with a script and logs the output. The "UpdateTaskProgress" method just handles logging to my logging structure and updating my UI. –  Mike G Jun 20 '12 at 12:34
    
I'm pretty sure Windows also won't allow you to redirect standard input/output/error across the admin/non-admin security boundary. You'll have to find a different way to get output from the program running as admin - Reference: stackoverflow.com/a/8690661 –  Kiquenet Sep 3 '14 at 10:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You want to use the Process.StandardOutput property. It's a stream that you can open to get the program's output

share|improve this answer
    
Is there not a way I can get alerted (an event) when output happens at the console. It seems like if I use the StandardOutput property I'll have to wait till the process exits. –  Mike G Jun 13 '12 at 13:09
    
You can spawn a new thread that will raise an event when it finds some output –  miniBill Jun 13 '12 at 13:10
    
Do you think it's acceptable to do the wait loop on the HasExited like I posted? Should I sleep inside that loop or just let it fly? –  Mike G Jun 13 '12 at 13:49
    
If you use the loop you should definitively sleep, otherwise you will soak up a lot of CPU doing nothing. The 80 char truncation is inherent to powershell, iirc. Instead of using a loop you can use this: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  miniBill Jun 13 '12 at 14:30
    
OK, I thought sleeping would be a good idea. I just want to get the output as the PowerShell executable writes it to StandardOut. Waiting till exit to get all the output is not really ideal as the whole point of this is to not only log this in the installer framework, but to show the current status/output to the user. –  Mike G Jun 13 '12 at 14:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.