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I have a few thousand records with a duplicate sortorder (which causes duplicate entries in other queries), so I'm trying to set a correct sort order for all those records.

First I set them all to -1 so the sortorder would start from 0, and then I execute this query:

UPDATE op.customeraddress SET sortorder = (SELECT MAX(ca.sortorder) + 1 
                                           FROM op.customeraddress AS ca 
                                           WHERE ca.customerid = customeraddress.customerid) 
WHERE id IN (<subquery for IDs>)

The problem is that the MAX() in the subquery always seems to return the same value - it doesn't know about an earlier update.

The query works fine if I manually apply it record by record.

Any ideas on how to do this without having to resort to looping?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This should do it:

with new_order as 
(
   select ctid as rid,
          row_number() over (partition by customerid order by sortorder) as rn
   from customeraddress
) 
update customeraddress ca
  set sortorder = new_order.rn 
where ca.ctid = new_order.rid;
  and ca.id IN (<subquery for IDs>);

No need to reset the sortorder before running this, it will renumber all customeraddresses for a one customerid according to the old order.

You need PostgreSQL 9.1 for the above solution (writeable CTEs)

For previous version this should do it:

update customeraddress ca
   set ca.sortorder = t.sortorder
from 
(
   select ctid as rid,
          row_number() over (partition by customerid order by sortorder) as rn
   from customeraddress
)  t
where ca.ctid = t.rid
  and ca.id IN (<subquery for IDs>);
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I'm running 9.1.2, but am getting a syntax error at using. Your second query works with a few column name modifications, although it starts counting from 1 (but that's easily solved). Thanks! –  elbekko Jun 15 '12 at 7:41
    
@elbekko: sorry, the USING was totally incorrect there. –  a_horse_with_no_name Jun 15 '12 at 7:54
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You could use a sequence:

CREATE TEMPORARY SEQUENCE sort_seq;
UPDATE op.customeraddress SET sort_order = (
     SELECT nextval('sort_seq')
     FROM op.customeraddress AS ca 
     WHERE ca.customerid = customeraddress.customerid
) WHERE id IN ...
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I don't think that'd work, as the sortorder for each customer has to start from 0. Unless I'm missing something? –  elbekko Jun 14 '12 at 7:00
    
"the sortorder for each customer has to start from 0" ... I must not understand the question then. When you create a sequence, it starts at 0. And you can still set them all to 0 first. –  Dondi Michael Stroma Jun 14 '12 at 21:57
    
The table customeraddress contains a number of addresses for each customer. With your query, for example, the first customer's addresses would get sortorder 0, 1. The second customer's addresses would get sortorder 2, 3. Unless I'm missing where the sequence is reset for every customer. –  elbekko Jun 15 '12 at 7:32
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