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It seems like gcc 4.6.2 removes code it considers unused from functions.

test.c

int main(void) {
  goto exit;
  handler:
    __asm__ __volatile__("jmp 0x0");
  exit:
  return 0;
}

Disassembly of main()

   0x08048404 <+0>:     push   ebp
   0x08048405 <+1>:     mov    ebp,esp
   0x08048407 <+3>:     nop    # <-- This is all whats left of my jmp.
   0x08048408 <+4>:     mov    eax,0x0
   0x0804840d <+9>:     pop    ebp
   0x0804840e <+10>:    ret

Compiler options

No optimizations enabled, just gcc -m32 -o test test.c (-m32 because I'm on a 64 bit machine).

How can I stop this behavior?

Edit: Preferably by using compiler options, not by modifing the code.

share|improve this question
    
Do you have optimizations turned on? –  RedX Jun 13 '12 at 13:17
    
No, see my edit. –  iblue Jun 13 '12 at 13:19
4  
Is there any particular reason you'd like to do this: is GCC eliminating code incorrectly? –  dbaupp Jun 13 '12 at 13:30
    
I am developing a debugging tool that modifies code and needs a trap handler inside a function that will be called from somewhere else. The code snipped is just for demonstrating the issue with gcc. –  iblue Jun 13 '12 at 13:33
    
P.S why are you specifying the __volatile__ with __asm__? It seems redundant, no? –  Eitan T Jun 17 '12 at 15:12

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted
+50

Update 2012/6/18

Just thinking about it, one can put the goto exit in an asm block, which means that only 1 line of code needs to change:

int main(void) {
  __asm__ ("jmp exit");

  handler:
    __asm__ __volatile__("jmp $0x0");
  exit:
  return 0;
}

That is significantly cleaner than my other solution below (and possibly nicer than @ugoren's current one too).


This is pretty hacky, but it seems to work: hide the handler in a conditional that can never be followed under normal conditions, but stop it from being eliminated by stopping the compiler from being able to do its analysis properly with some inline assembler.

int main (void) {
  int x = 0;
  __asm__ __volatile__ ("" : "=r"(x));
  // compiler can't tell what the value of x is now, but it's always 0

  if (x) {
handler:
    __asm__ __volatile__ ("jmp $0x0");
  }

  return 0;
}

Even with -O3 the jmp is preserved:

    testl   %eax, %eax   
    je      .L2     
.L3:
    jmp $0x0
.L2:
    xorl    %eax, %eax 
    ret

(This seems really dodgy, so I hope there is a better way to do this. edit just putting a volatile in front of x works so one doesn't need to do the inline asm trickery.)

share|improve this answer
    
+1: I like your new solution! –  Eitan T Jun 19 '12 at 7:39

Looks like that's just the way it is - When gcc sees that code within a function is unreachable, it removes it. Other compilers might be different.
In gcc, an early phase in compilation is building the "control flow graph" - a graph of "basic blocks", each free of conditions, connected by branches. When emitting the actual code, parts of the graph, which are not reachable from the root, are discarded.
This isn't part of the optimization phase, and is therefore unaffected by compilation options.

So any solution would involve making gcc think that the code is reachable.

My suggestion:

Instead of putting your assembly code in an unreachable place (where GCC may remove it), you can put it in a reachable place, and skip over the problematic instruction:

int main(void) {
     goto exit;

     exit:
     __asm__ __volatile__ (
        "jmp 1f\n"
        "jmp $0x0\n"
        "1:\n"
    );
    return 0;
}

Also, see this thread about the issue.

share|improve this answer

Would this work, make it so gcc can't know its unreachable

int main(void)  
{ 
    volatile int y = 1;
    if (y) goto exit;
handler:
    __asm__ __volatile__("jmp 0x0");  
exit:   
    return 0; 
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1: Nice. This is very similar to dbaupp's updated answer. –  Eitan T Jun 20 '12 at 16:04

I've never heard of a way to prevent gcc from removing unreachable code; it seems that no matter what you do, once gcc detects unreachable code it always removes it (use gcc's -Wunreachable-code option to see what it considers to be unreachable).

That said, you can still put this code in a static function and it won't be optimized out:

static int func()
{
    __asm__ __volatile__("jmp $0x0");
}

int main(void)
{
    goto exit;

handler:
    func();

exit:
    return 0;
}

P.S
This solution is particularily handy if you want to avoid code redundancy when implanting the same "handler" code block in more than one place in the original code.

share|improve this answer
2  
Best I've seen so far. Nice trick with the static function! I was trying to get similar behavior by putting __attribute__((__noinline__)) to no avail. Only real problem is that I suspect for debugging the jmp $0x0 needs to actually be in the function. Though I might be wrong. Either way I love the elegance of this answer! :) –  nixeagle Jun 17 '12 at 16:48

gcc may duplicate asm statements inside functions and remove them during optimisation (even at -O0), so this will never work reliably.

one way to do this reliably is to use a global asm statement (i.e. an asm statement outside of any function). gcc will copy this straight to the output and you can use global labels without any problems.

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Could you try to add the -O0 options at the compiler, that should remove any optimization, ket me know!

pedr0

share|improve this answer
    
Nope, it doesn't. –  iblue Jun 21 '12 at 14:37
3  
gcc does this before the optimization phase, it basically creates a graph of possible code branches and removes any segments not reachable from the root. It's not an optimization and no command line options can remove the behaivor. –  8bitwide Jun 21 '12 at 14:45

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