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C++11 allows inline namespaces, all members of which are also automatically in the enclosing namespace. I cannot think of any useful application of this -- can somebody please give a brief, succinct example of a situation where an inline namespace is needed and where it is the most idiomatic solution?

(Also, it is not clear to me what happens when a namespace is declared inline in one but not all declarations, which may live in different files. Isn't this begging for trouble?)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 97 down vote accepted

Inline namespaces are a library versioning feature akin to symbol versioning, but implemented purely at the C++11 level (ie. cross-platform) instead of being a feature of a specific binary executable format (ie. platform-specific).

It is a mechanism by which a library author can make a nested namespace look and act as if all its declarations were in the surrounding namespace (inline namespaces can be nested, so "more-nested" names percolate up all the way to the first non-inline namespace and look and act as if their declarations were in any of the namespaces in between, too).

As an example, consider the STL implementation of vector. If we had inline namespaces from the beginning of C++, then in C++98 the header <vector> might have looked like this:

namespace std {

#if __cplusplus < 1997L // pre-standard C++
    inline
#endif

    namespace pre_cxx_1997 {
        template <class T> __vector_impl; // implementation class
        template <class T> // e.g. w/o allocator argument
        class vector : __vector_impl<T> { // private inheritance
            // ...
        };
    }
#if __cplusplus >= 1997L // C++98/03 or later
                         // (ifdef'ed out b/c it probably uses new language
                         // features that a pre-C++98 compiler would choke on)
#  if __cplusplus == 1997L // C++98/03
    inline
#  endif

    namespace cxx_1997 {

        // std::vector now has an allocator argument
        template <class T, class Alloc=std::allocator<T> >
        class vector : pre_cxx_1997::__vector_impl<T> { // the old impl is still good
            // ...
        };

        // and vector<bool> is special:
        template <class Alloc=std::allocator<bool> >
        class vector<bool> {
            // ...
        };

    };

#endif // C++98/03 or later

} // namespace std

Depending on the value of __cplusplus, either one or the other vector implementation is chosen. If your codebase was written in pre-C++98 times, and you find that the C++98 version of vector is causing trouble for you when you upgrade your compiler, "all" you have to do is to find the references to std::vector in your codebase and replace them by std::pre_cxx_1997::vector.

Come the next standard, and the STL vendor just repeats the procedure again, introducing a new namespace for std::vector with emplace_back support (which requires C++11) and inlining that one iff __cplusplus == 201103L.

OK, so why do I need a new language feature for this? I can already do the following to have the same effect, no?

namespace std {

    namespace pre_cxx_1997 {
        // ...
    }
#if __cplusplus < 1997L // pre-standard C++
    using namespace pre_cxx_1997;
#endif

#if __cplusplus >= 1997L // C++98/03 or later
                         // (ifdef'ed out b/c it probably uses new language
                         // features that a pre-C++98 compiler would choke on)

    namespace cxx_1997 {
        // ...
    };
#  if __cplusplus == 1997L // C++98/03
    using namespace cxx_1997;
#  endif

#endif // C++98/03 or later

} // namespace std

Depending on the value of __cplusplus, I get either one or the other of the implementations.

And you'd be almost correct.

Consider the following valid C++98 user code (it was permitted to fully specialize templates that live in namespace std in C++98 already):

// I don't trust my STL vendor to do this optimisation, so force these 
// specializations myself:
namespace std {
    template <>
    class vector<MyType> : my_special_vector<MyType> {
        // ...
    };
    template <>
    class vector<MyOtherType> : my_special_vector<MyOtherType> {
        // ...
    };
    // ...etc...
} // namespace std

This is perfectly valid code where the user supplies its own implementation of a vector for a set of type where she apparently knows a more efficient implementation than the one found in (her copy of the STL).

But: When specializing a template, you need to do so in the namespace it was declared in. The Standard says that vector is declared in namespace std, so that's where the user rightfully expects to specialize the type.

This code works with a non-versioned namespace std, or with the C++11 inline namespace feature, but not with the versioning trick that used using namespace <nested>, because that exposes the implementation detail that the true namespace in which vector was defined was not std directly.

There are other holes by which you could detect the nested namespace (see comments below), but inline namespaces plug them all. And that's all there is to it. Immensely useful for the future, but AFAIK the Standard doesn't prescribe inline namespace names for its own standard library (I'd love to be proven wrong on this, though), so it can only be used for third-party libraries, not the standard itself (unless the compiler vendors agree on a naming scheme).

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4  
+1 for explaining why using namespace V99; doesn't work in Stroustrup's example. –  Steve Jessop Jun 13 '12 at 16:00
1  
I suppose that versioning in the standard libraries in a standard way, is limited compared with 3rd party versioning. If C++21 vector is no good for me, and I need C++11 vector, then that might be because of a breaking change in C++21. But it might be because of an implementation detail that I shouldn't have relied on in the first place. The standard can't require that every C++21 implementation provides a std::cxx_11::vector that's bug compatible with any past std::vector from the same vendor. Third party libraries can undertake to do that, if they think it's worth it for them. –  Steve Jessop Jun 13 '12 at 16:01
2  
And similarly, if I start a brand new C++21 implementation from scratch, then I don't want to be burdened implementing a lot of old nonsense in std::cxx_11. Not every compiler will always implement all old versions of the standard libraries, even though it's tempting at the moment to think that it would be very little burden to require existing implementations to leave in the old when they add the new, since in fact they all are anyway. I suppose what the standard could usefully have done is made it optional, but with a standard name if present. –  Steve Jessop Jun 13 '12 at 16:02
1  
@Walter: g++ -std=c++11 -x c++ -dM -E - < /dev/null says __cplusplus is defined as 201103L. Cf. also 16.8 [cpp.predefined]. –  Marc Mutz - mmutz Jun 13 '12 at 18:36
18  
That's not all there is to it. ADL also was a reason (ADL won't follow using directives), and name lookup too. (using namespace A in a namespace B makes names in namespace B hide names in namespace A if you look for B::name - not so with inline namespaces). –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 15 '12 at 11:27

http://www.stroustrup.com/C++11FAQ.html#inline-namespace (a document written by and maintained by Bjarne Stroustrup, who you'd think should be aware of most motivations for most C++11 features.)

According to that, it is to allow versioning for backward-compatibility. You define multiple inner namespaces, and make the most recent one inline. Or anyway, the default one for people who don't care about versioning. I suppose the most recent one could be a future or cutting-edge version which is not yet default.

The example given is:

// file V99.h:
inline namespace V99 {
    void f(int);    // does something better than the V98 version
    void f(double); // new feature
    // ...
}

// file V98.h:
namespace V98 {
    void f(int);    // does something
    // ...
}

// file Mine.h:
namespace Mine {
#include "V99.h"
#include "V98.h"
}

#include "Mine.h"
using namespace Mine;
// ...
V98::f(1);  // old version
V99::f(1);  // new version
f(1);       // default version

I don't immediately see why you don't put using namespace V99; inside namespace Mine, but I don't have to entirely understand the use-case in order to take Bjarne's word for it on the committee's motivation.

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So in fact the last f(1) version would be called from the inline V99 namespace? –  Eitan T Jun 13 '12 at 13:55
1  
@EitanT: yes, because the global namespace has using namespace Mine;, and the Mine namespace contains everything from the inline namespace Mine::V99. –  Steve Jessop Jun 13 '12 at 13:56
    
but for this to work, I would need to add inline to file V99.h. What happens when file V100.h comes about, declaring inline namespace V100, and I include it too into Mine? Which f(int) is called by f(1)? –  Walter Jun 13 '12 at 13:59
1  
@Walter: you remove inline from file V99.h in the release that includes V100.h. You also modify Mine.h at the same time, of course, to add an extra include. Mine.h is part of the library, not part of the client code. –  Steve Jessop Jun 13 '12 at 14:01
4  
@walter: they're not installing V100.h, they're installing a library called "Mine". There are 3 header files in version 99 of "Mine" -- Mine.h, V98.h and V99.h. There are 4 header files in version 100 of "Mine" -- Mine.h, V98.h, V99.h and V100.h. The arrangement of the header files is an implementation detail that is irrelevant to users. If they discover some compatibility problem which means they need to use specifically Mine::V98::f from some or all of their code, they can mix calls to Mine::V98::f from old code with calls to Mine::f in newly-written code. –  Steve Jessop Jun 13 '12 at 14:11

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