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When writing code, I often place debug messages in the code. The debug messages are handled by a logger class, which outputs the messages to file in debug mode and discards them in release modes.

It looks a little something like this:

class Logger : IDisposable
{
    private StreamWriter m_Logger = null;

    public void Start(string logFile)
    {
        m_Logger = new StreamWriter(logFile);
        m_Logger.AutoFlush = true;
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (m_Logger != null) m_Logger.Dispose();
    }

    public void WriteLine(string message)
    {
        if (m_Logger != null) m_Logger.WriteLine(message);
    }
}

An instance is created at startup, and is accessible from the Program class. I then check for debug like this:

#if DEBUG
Program.Log.Start("app.log");
#endif

This works great, in that it dumps debug info when in debug mode, and doesn't in release mode. However, if I run the release executable through a utility such as strings, I can still see the debug strings. I'd prefer to keep them out of the release build entirely, to help prevent reverse engineering.

The only solution I've found so far is to wrap all debug messages in preprocessor conditionals:

// < some code here >
#if DEBUG
Program.Log.WriteLine("Some debug message.");
#endif
// < more code here >

This is pretty tedious and ugly. My first thought was to use some sort of preprocessor macro, but C# doesn't support them. Is there a more elegant solution than the one I'm using right now?

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2  
I'm not sure if that's what you're looking for, but maybe you could mark the methods in the logger with a conditional DEBUG attribute? –  Patryk Ćwiek Jun 13 '12 at 13:51
    
You really need to check out log4net. –  Jeremy Holovacs Jun 13 '12 at 13:53
    
@JeremyHolovacs I've used log4net before, but this project is way too small to warrant the external library. –  Polynomial Jun 13 '12 at 13:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

To avoid using #if-#endif on each WriteLine call, try using ConditionalAttribute on the logger method itself:

[Conditional("DEBUG")]
public void WriteLine(string message)
{
    if (m_Logger != null) m_Logger.WriteLine(message);
}

This will be excluded from MSIL in case of a Release build.

Applying ConditionalAttribute to a method indicates to compilers that a call to the method should not be compiled into Microsoft intermediate language (MSIL) unless the conditional compilation symbol that is associated with ConditionalAttribute is defined. Applying ConditionalAttribute to an attribute indicates that the attribute should not be emitted to metadata unless the conditional compilation symbol is defined

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This will cause all of the calls to WriteLine to fail unless they are also excluded won't they? –  Jason Coyne Jun 13 '12 at 14:00
    
Why to fail? Just won't be executed in a Release build, as they will be missing from the code. –  Tisho Jun 13 '12 at 14:01
    
It removes the target method and causes the compiler to essentially ignore all of the calls, removing them from the IL entirely. This works perfectly! :) –  Polynomial Jun 13 '12 at 14:01
    
@Polynomial: Glad to hear that. I've used it once for the same reason :) –  Tisho Jun 13 '12 at 14:03
2  
@Lieven Yup, that's the case. Just verified with ildasm - no calls, no method code. Impressive indeed! –  Polynomial Jun 13 '12 at 14:20

1) Put the #ifdef inside the body of the the log method, so that you dont have to put defines around every log message

2) If you are trying to prevent reverse engineering, obfuscate the code,which would encrypt the strings, but this is not a failsafe.

3) You could use something like PostSharp to actively delete the code from the MSIL after the fact http://www.sharpcrafters.com/solutions/logging

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