Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Why can't I use setTimeout in a javascript object?

Message = function () {

    ...
    ...        

    this.messageFactory = ...
    this.feedbackTag = document.getElementById('feedbackMessages');

    this.addInfo = function (message) {
        var info = this.messageFactory.createInfo(message); // create a div
        this.feedbackTag.appendChild(info);

        setTimeout('this.feedbackTag.removeChild(info)', 5000);
        // why in here, it complain this.feedbacktag is undefined ??????

    };
}

Thanks for Steve`s Solution, now it will work if the code is as below... because the 'this' before was actually pointing to the function within setTimeOut, it cannot rearch Message.

Message = function () {

    ...
    ...        

    this.messageFactory = ...
    this.feedbackTag = document.getElementById('feedbackMessages');

    this.addInfo = function (message) {
        var info = this.messageFactory.createInfo(message); // create a div
        this.feedbackTag.appendChild(info);

        var _this = this;
        setTimeout(function() { _this.feedbackTag.removeChild(info); }, 5000);

    };
}

But why doesn`t it work if we do this:

Message = function () {

    ...
    ...        

    this.messageFactory = ...
    this.feedbackTag = document.getElementById('feedbackMessages');
    // public function
    this.addInfo = function (message) {
        var info = this.messageFactory.createInfo(message); // create a div
        this.feedbackTag.appendChild(info);

        delayRemove(info);

    };
    // private function
    function delayRemove(obj) {
        var _this = this;
        setTimeout(function() { _this.feedbackTag.removeChild(info); }, 5000);
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of How to access the correct this / context inside a callback? – Bergi Nov 14 '14 at 2:20
up vote 82 down vote accepted

Try replacing this line:

setTimeout('this.feedbackTag.removeChild(info)', 5000);

with these two lines:

var _this = this;
setTimeout(function() { _this.feedbackTag.removeChild(info); }, 5000);

Note:

Never pass setTimeout a string, as this invokes eval (which you should only use when necessary). Instead, pass setTimeout a function reference (this can be an anonymous function).

Finally, always check that the this keyword is pointing to what you think it points to (see http://www.alistapart.com/articles/getoutbindingsituations).

Addressing Question 2:

I believe that for normal functions, this is set to the window object—regardless of where they are declared. So moving the code into a separate function wouldn't fix the problem.

share|improve this answer
1  
Wouldn't that introduce a memory leak? – tsilb Jul 9 '09 at 3:49
1  
@shrimpy: It's a complex problem, but this article describes it quite well: alistapart.com/articles/getoutbindingsituations. Basically, "this" doesn't point to the Message class inside the anonymous function. To fix this problem, we create a variable (I called it "_this"), make it point to the correct Message class, and then use this variable when we want to reference the class inside the anonymous function. – Steve Harrison Jul 9 '09 at 4:04
    
@tslib: In what way? This workaround is quite common. If you're worried that the anonymous function is going to keep things tied up, I'm pretty sure that it will be zapped by the Garbage Collector as soon as "setTimeout" has finished with it. – Steve Harrison Jul 9 '09 at 4:16
    
@tsilb: Whoops—I spelt your username incorrectly in my previous comment! Sorry! – Steve Harrison Jul 9 '09 at 4:18
1  
There is a closure, as the anonymous function accesses the _this variable, which is outside of its own immediate lexical scope. – yerforkferchips Sep 1 '14 at 14:16

A neater way is to just pass this as an argument to the function being called in the timeout:

function delayRemove(obj) {
  setTimeout(function(_this) {
      _this.feedbackTag.removeChild(obj);
    }, 5000, this);
}

You should really pass obj as an argument as well, just to make sure it is in scope (the number of parameters is unlimited):

function delayRemove(obj) {
  setTimeout(function(_this, removeObj) {
      _this.feedbackTag.removeChild(removeObj);
    }, 5000, this, obj);
}

HTML5 and Node.js extended the setTimeout function to accept parameters which are passed to your callback function. It has the following method signature.

setTimeout(callback, delay, [param1, param2, ...])

As setTimeout isn't actually a JavaScript feature your results may vary across browsers. I couldn't find any concrete details of support, however as I said this is in the HTML5 spec.

share|improve this answer
1  
all browsers now support the third parameter of setTimeout? – StefanoCudini Feb 17 '13 at 18:35
    
@StefanoCudini Answer updated. – Luca Spiller Dec 29 '13 at 14:42

To answer your last question: "Why doesn`t it work if we do this":

Message = function () {

...
...        

this.messageFactory = ...
this.feedbackTag = document.getElementById('feedbackMessages');
// public function
this.addInfo = function (message) {
    var info = this.messageFactory.createInfo(message); // create a div
    this.feedbackTag.appendChild(info);

    delayRemove(info);

};
// private function
function delayRemove(obj) {
    var _this = this;
    setTimeout(function() { _this.feedbackTag.removeChild(info); }, 5000);
}}

It's not working because you are passing an undefined variable (info) instead of a defined variable (obj). Here is the corrected function:

function delayRemove(obj) {
var _this = this;
setTimeout(function() { _this.feedbackTag.removeChild(obj); }, 5000);}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.