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I have a couple of SQL statements that calculate averages within a stored procedure:

SELECT AVG(x) INTO _5dayaverage FROM (SELECT x FROM my_data ORDER BY create_date DESC LIMIT 5) AS temptable;
SELECT AVG(x) INTO _10dayaverage FROM (SELECT x FROM my_data ORDER BY create_date DESC LIMIT 10) AS temptable;

Is it possible to write these in such a way that I'm only doing a SELECT once instead of making use of a derived table? As I need to calculate averages for 5, 10, 20, 28, 30, 35 and 50 days, it it possible to do all that within a single query instead of doing a SELECT over and over again?

share|improve this question
1  
Is this MySQL or SQL Server? I don't think it should be tagged both. – Aaron Bertrand Jun 13 '12 at 15:08
    
It's MySql, but SQL Server folks can give their input as well. – Zishan Jun 13 '12 at 15:23
1  
Why? If the answer differs for SQL Server, is it going to be valid? Are you going to be able to use the answer that @LeviW posted, for example? If not, you've wasted his time. – Aaron Bertrand Jun 13 '12 at 15:24
2  
Some, yes. But by that extension you could also cast a much wider net, and tag it Oracle, DB2, PostgreSQL, etc. etc. If I want to know how to fix something on my Mercedes, why would I post to a BMW forum? In case I might hit someone who knows how to fix both? – Aaron Bertrand Jun 13 '12 at 15:34
3  
Well Levi posted a solution that works on SQL Server, but you didn't accept that solution or even up-vote it. So I would argue that he did waste his time trying to help you based on your misleading tag. And I've wasted a bunch of time here simply because I watch the sql-server tag and this showed up on my list. If you'd tagged appropriately in the first place, you wouldn't have to deal with me. – Aaron Bertrand Jun 13 '12 at 16:41
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need to use an incrementing variable to get a rownumber in MySQL:

SELECT  AVG(CASE WHEN RowNumber <= 5 THEN X END) AS Avg_5,
        AVG(CASE WHEN RowNumber <= 10 THEN X END) AS Avg_10,
        AVG(CASE WHEN RowNumber <= 15 THEN X END) AS Avg_15,
        AVG(CASE WHEN RowNumber <= 20 THEN X END) AS Avg_20,
        AVG(CASE WHEN RowNumber <= 25 THEN X END) AS Avg_25,
        AVG(CASE WHEN RowNumber <= 30 THEN X END) AS Avg_30,
        AVG(CASE WHEN RowNumber <= 35 THEN X END) AS Avg_35
FROM    (   SELECT  @i:= @i + 1 AS RowNumber, x
            FROM    My_Data,
                    (SELECT @i:=0) AS i
            ORDER BY Create_Date DESC
        ) AS Data

http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/7a250/1

share|improve this answer
    
Perfect! Thanks! – Zishan Jun 13 '12 at 16:30

You could use ROW_NUMBER() with a common table expression. Assuming you're using SQL Server 2005+

WITH Numbered AS (
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY create_date DESC) AS RowNum,
   X
FROM my_data)

SELECT AVG(CASE WHEN RowNum <= 5 THEN X ELSE NULL END) AS _5_Day_Avg,
   AVG(CASE WHEN RowNum <= 10 THEN X ELSE NULL END) AS _10_Day_Avg
FROM Numbered
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the time you wasted here. – Aaron Bertrand Jun 13 '12 at 16:46

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