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I am working with JAXB 2.0 version. For this I am creating JAXBContext object in the following way:

package com;

import javax.xml.bind.JAXBContext;
import javax.xml.bind.JAXBException;

public class JAXBContextFactory {

    public static JAXBContext createJAXBContext() throws JAXBException {
        JAXBContext jaxbContext = JAXBContext.newInstance(Customer.class);

        return jaxbContext;
    }

}

Basically since creating JAXBContext is very expensive, I want to create the JAXBContext once and only once for the entire application. So I put the JAXBContext code under static method as shown above.

Now the requests will call the JAXBContextFactory.createJAXBContext(); whenever it needs reference to JAXBContex. Now my question is , in this case is the JAXBContext created only once or will the application have multiple instances of JAXBContext?

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1  
Take a look at the singleton design pattern. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singleton_pattern – climbage Jun 13 '12 at 15:12
    
Dup: stackoverflow.com/questions/794354/… – wrschneider Jun 13 '12 at 15:13
    
@Vipar Not really, I didn't actually answer his question – climbage Jun 13 '12 at 15:14
    
ya i know i can achieve this with Singleton , but my question is if i simply use a static method for returning JAXBContext reference , will it create multiple instances of JAXBContext Objects ?? – Preethi Jain Jun 13 '12 at 15:15
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your application will have one instance of JAXBContext for each time this method is called.

If you do not want this to happen, you need to do the following thing

package com;

import javax.xml.bind.JAXBContext;
import javax.xml.bind.JAXBException;

public class JAXBContextFactory {

    private static JAXBContext context = null;
    public static synchronized JAXBContext createJAXBContext() throws JAXBException {
        if(context == null){
            context = JAXBContext.newInstance(Customer.class);
        }
        return context;
    }

}

The difference between this and your implementation is that in this one, we save the instance of JAXBContext that was created in a static variable (which is guaranteed to exist only once). In your implementation you are not saving the instance you just created anywhere, and will just create a new instance every time the method is called. Important: do not forget the synchronized keyword added to the method declaration, as it makes sure that calling this method in a multi-threaded environment will still work as expected.

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Thank you very much for the explanation . i am very much clear now with the concept . Thanks once again . – Preethi Jain Jun 13 '12 at 15:17
    
I have one more question , i see i can achieve the single instance of JAXBContext using static block or with help of doing a check this way if(context == null) , could anybody please tell me , whats the difference and what is preferable ?? – Preethi Jain Jun 13 '12 at 15:27
2  
If you put it in a static initialization block, your instance will be created the first time the JVM encouters your class (basically, when the JVM first notices that the JAXBContextFactory class exist), which could be anytime and is not under your control. That's basically active initialization. If you do it in the createJAXBContext() method, the instance will only be created the first time the method is called. That's lazy initialization. – LordOfThePigs Jun 13 '12 at 15:36
    
Thanks that really helped a lot . – Preethi Jain Jun 13 '12 at 15:42

Your implementation will create a new JAXBContext for every request to it. Instead, you can do:

public class JAXBContextFactory {
    private static JAXBContext jaxbContext;

    static {
        try {
            jaxbContext = JAXBContext.newInstance(Customer.class);
        } catch (JAXBException ignored) {
        }
    }

    public static JAXBContext createJAXBContext() {
        return jaxbContext;
    }

}
share|improve this answer
3  
You might want to throw an AssertionError instead of ignoring the exception. – Peter Lawrey Jun 13 '12 at 15:14
1  
And make the static final. – Tom Hawtin - tackline Jun 13 '12 at 19:39
    
That really won't matter much, but I do agree :) Btw, I think this is better than having to synchronize on the method, like the answer below. If the application is actually using this functionality, it might as well initialize the static value upon classloading, and skip the synchronization on each method invocation. – Edvin Syse Jun 13 '12 at 19:52

Your method will clearly create a new JAXBContext each time it is called.

If you want to ensure that only one instance will be created, regardless of how many times your method is called, then you are looking for the Singleton Pattern, an implementation of which would look something like this:

public class JAXBContextFactory {
  private static JAXBContext INSTANCE;
  public static JAXBContext getJAXBContext() throws JAXBException {
    if (JAXBContextFactory.INSTANCE == null) {
      INSTANCE = JAXBContext.newInstance(Customer.class);
    }
    return INSTANCE;
  }
}

Keep in mind that this instance will only be unique per Java classloader.

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1  
This implementation is not synchronized and might not work correctly in a Multi-threaded context. – LordOfThePigs Jun 13 '12 at 15:20
    
@LordOfThePigs It doesn't appear to matter if two instances are created in this case, although the lazy initialisation code is pointless mess. – Tom Hawtin - tackline Jun 13 '12 at 19:37

You will have one instance each time the method is called. Using a static context just means you don't have any instances of JAXBContextFactory

Perhaps what you use instead is

public enum JAXBContextFactory {;

    private static JAXBContext jaxbContext = null;

    public synchronized static JAXBContext createJAXBContext() throws JAXBException {
        if (jaxbContext == null)
            jaxbContext = JAXBContext.newInstance(Customer.class);
        return jaxbContext;
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
The lazy initialisation is pointless. – Tom Hawtin - tackline Jun 13 '12 at 19:38
    
@TomHawtin-tackline: that's a sweeping assertion. If the calling code never happens to need the JAXBContext then it is not pointless to lazily initialize it, in fact it is a potentially useful optimization. Suffice to say there's not enough in the question to clearly say one way or the other. – maerics Jun 13 '12 at 19:50
1  
@maerics Class loading is lay anyway. – Tom Hawtin - tackline Jun 13 '12 at 20:14

After analyzing the other answers and @tom-hawtin-tackline comments, I think the simplest solution is:

public class JAXBContextFactory {

    private static final JAXBContext CONTEXT = createContext();

    private static JAXBContext createContext() {
        try {
            return JAXBContext.newInstance(Customer.class);
        } catch (JAXBException e) {
            throw new AssertionError(e);
        }
    }

    public static JAXBContext getContext() { return CONTEXT; }

}
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