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I have a table that has list of stored procedures.

I am using a cursor to then loop through and call and capture the result of each stored procedure (they all return 0 or 1).

So I have:

DECLARE @PROC_ID INT,
        @PROC_NAME VARCHAR(50)

SELECT *
INTO #MY_PROCS
FROM TABLE_PROCS

DECLARE MY_CURSOR CURSOR FOR
SELECT PROC_ID, PROC_NAME
FROM TABLE_PROCS

OPEN MY_CURSOR
FETCH NEXT FROM MY_CURSOR INTO @PROC_ID, @PROC_NAME

WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0
BEGIN
  SELECT @PROC_RESULT = .......

  UPDATE #MY_PROCS SET PROC_RESULT = @PROC_RESULT WHERE PROC_ID = @PROC_ID
END

CLOSE MY_CURSOR
DEALLOCATE MY_CURSOR

DROP TABLE #MY_PROCS

I was reading on cursors, and read I should be setting it as READ ONLY and NO LOCK if possible.

Also, should I be using a table variable instead of a temp table?

Is it possible to do this w/o a cursor?

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4  
Is it possible to do WHAT? You left out the important part with SELECT @PROC_RESULT - ...... - I don't know the right syntax for ...... –  Aaron Bertrand Jun 13 '12 at 15:11
2  
It is ALWAYS possible to work without a cursor....and 99.9% of the time preferred....AVOID CURSORS –  Justin Pihony Jun 13 '12 at 15:13
2  
without locks will not be possible - even WITH (NOLOCK) takes some locks (and lock are an integral part of SQL Server's operation - you cannot just turn those off) –  marc_s Jun 13 '12 at 15:15
2  
@Romil can you please explain how an identity column on the #temp table will help here? I don't think the problem has anything to do with an inability to loop. –  Aaron Bertrand Jun 13 '12 at 15:18
1  
@JustinPihony ok but cursors are like a lot of other things in the programming world, and life in general. If you use them correctly, you shouldn't have to track down anything, and cursors are not the only thing you can abuse in SQL Server (personally I've never had to track down a memory leak actually caused by a cursor, but I can imagine that the way they're used can definitely contribute to that). I know there are car accidents on the highway every day but sometimes that's the best way to get somewhere. –  Aaron Bertrand Jun 14 '12 at 15:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The most efficient cursor is going to be, at least in all of my testing:

DECLARE MY_CURSOR CURSOR 
  LOCAL STATIC READ_ONLY FORWARD_ONLY
FOR ...

Now, it's impossible for us to know if you can do this without a cursor. You've conveniently left out the only information we could have used to tell you that. It seems you are calling a procedure for each call, but you can't be doing that with SELECT. And then you update a table with the result, but you drop the table.

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So you have two tables, one of which you want to update with values from the other and they share a common key. Here you go:

update [m]
set proc_id = t.proc_id
from #MY_PROCS as [m]
inner join TABLE_PROCS as [t]
   on m.proc_id = t.proc_id
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