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quite a newbie question, i'm sure, but i wasn't able to find an answer...
I have a control (in this case- a combo box) which is bound to a ViewModel property:

<ComboBox 
      x:Name="methodTypeCmb"
      Grid.Row="0" Grid.Column="2" 
      ItemsSource="{Binding Path=AllNames, Mode=OneTime}"
      SelectedItem="{Binding Path=Name, ValidatesOnDataErrors=True, Mode=TwoWay}"
      Validation.ErrorTemplate="{x:Null}"
      />

In my ViewModel, when this property changes, I want to ask the user to confirm the change.
If the user clicks 'no', I want to cancel the change.
However, I must be doing something wrong, because my view doesn't revert back to the previous value when the change is cancelled.

The ViewModel's property:

public string Name
{
    get { return m_model.Name; }
    set
    {
        if (MessageBox.Show("Are you absolutely sure?","Change ",MessageBoxButton.YesNo) == MessageBoxResult.Yes)
        {
            // change name
        }
        base.OnPropertyChanged("Name");
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
What exact control are you using, and what editable property are you binding to meaning how exactly is the user setting the value from the UI? –  jimmyjambles Jun 14 '12 at 16:33
    
I'm using a combobox. I'll give your code snippet a try and will let you know. thanks! –  sJhonny Jun 17 '12 at 20:56

1 Answer 1

Because you are cancelling within the scope of the text changing event, wpf ignores the property changed event. You must call it from the dispatcher

        Dispatcher.CurrentDispatcher.BeginInvoke((ThreadStart)delegate
        {
            OnPropertyChanged("Name");
        });

You should leave your existing "OnPropertyChanged("Name");" at the bottom of the function just add the above line to the block where you are cancelling

EDIT: The following code works I have tested it

        public string Newtext
        {
            get
            {
                return this._newtext;
            }
            set
            {
                if (MessageBox.Show("Apply?", "", MessageBoxButton.YesNo) == MessageBoxResult.Yes)
                {
                    this._newtext = value;
                    this.OnPropertyChanged("Newtext"); //Ignored
                }
                else
                {
                    Dispatcher.CurrentDispatcher.Invoke((ThreadStart)delegate
                    {
                        OnPropertyChanged("Newtext");
                    });
                }
            }
        }
share|improve this answer
    
used Dispatcher.CurrentDispatcher. didn't work. But I think you're on the right track with the idea of changing within the change event –  sJhonny Jun 14 '12 at 7:42
    
Works fine on my end, posted a functioning snippet of a test accessor I used on a viewmodel. Apologies for the "CurrentDispatcher" omission, must have copied the wrong snippet. –  jimmyjambles Jun 14 '12 at 15:41
    
I was using a TextBox to test and it would seem that the behavior is not the same for all controls, see above comment on question. –  jimmyjambles Jun 14 '12 at 16:34
    
for my combobox it gives strange behaviour after the first time it's invoked (i.e not updating the bound property correctly). strange.. –  sJhonny Jun 21 '12 at 7:31

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