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I am looking into abstract classes and interfaces.

Can someone tell me if there is a difference between a fully abstract class and an interface?

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I can't believe you asked it here –  adarshr Jun 13 '12 at 15:37
    
Many people can as its a very common question. What do you want to knwo that the million pages on this topic don't tell you? –  Peter Lawrey Jun 13 '12 at 15:37
    
Have you googled, yahood or binged this at least? –  Jaco Van Niekerk Jun 13 '12 at 15:37
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"Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." -- George Santayana 1905 –  Peter Lawrey Jun 13 '12 at 15:38
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@JacoVanNiekerk Trying to be politically correct? :p –  keyser Jun 13 '12 at 15:44

5 Answers 5

Google is your friend, so use it.

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Well I did and found: interview-questions-java.com/abstract-class-interface.htm . Reading here I read there's no differnce. I thought this was wrong so hoped someone here could help me. –  Alan Jun 13 '12 at 15:37
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@Gemma You should have read this :p –  keyser Jun 13 '12 at 15:38
    
Thanks. I think the person who gave the answers to the interview questions on the link maybe didn't get the job :-) –  Alan Jun 13 '12 at 15:39
    
@Gemma That link lists ten differences. –  Peter Lawrey Jun 13 '12 at 15:42

There certainly are differences. The first few that I can think of are

  • You can not inherit multiple abstract classes, where you can implement multiple interfaces
  • You can write a decorator for an interface but not for an abstract class
  • You can provide default implementations in an abstract class, but not in an interface. This allows to extend an abstract class in a backwards compatible way, which is not possible with an interface
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number 3 is irrelevant for this question- the OP explicitly asks about pure abstract classes –  amit Jun 13 '12 at 15:38
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@amit I think it is relevant in case the OP is developing an API. Even when at this point in time he can choose between an pure abstract class and an interface, it does not necessarily mean he wouldn't want to add methods in later releases. –  Robin Jun 13 '12 at 15:40

An abstract class can contain method implementation while an interface can't.

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and, "Unlike interfaces, abstract classes can contain fields that are not static and final" see my link on the "Google"-answer. –  keyser Jun 13 '12 at 15:39
    
Therefore, interfaces are great to store constant fields. (I hope it's not a bad programming style). Well, there are really plenty of differences. EDIT: oops, that's just what you've written :) –  iozee Jun 13 '12 at 15:41

In Interface :

you can only declare the variables, Methods but no defination is written in this interface

Abstract class : while a class is declared as Abstract class then the declarations may or may not include abstract methods.In abstract class we can write the definitions also. Unlike interfaces, abstract classes can contain fields that are not static and final.

Such abstract classes are similar to interfaces, except that they provide a partial implementation, leaving it to subclasses to complete the implementation.

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READ THE JAVA DOCUMENTATION!

Abstract Classes versus Interfaces

Unlike interfaces, abstract classes can contain fields that are not static and final, and they can contain implemented methods. Such abstract classes are similar to interfaces, except that they provide a partial implementation, leaving it to subclasses to complete the implementation. If an abstract class contains only abstract method declarations, it should be declared as an interface instead.

Multiple interfaces can be implemented by classes anywhere in the class hierarchy, whether or not they are related to one another in any way. Think of Comparable or Cloneable, for example.

By comparison, abstract classes are most commonly subclassed to share pieces of implementation. A single abstract class is subclassed by similar classes that have a lot in common (the implemented parts of the abstract class), but also have some differences (the abstract methods).

There is a difference between a fully abstract class and an interface?

If all methods are abstract the behaviour is almost (not exactly) the same, but yes there are differences. Mainly because a class can't extends from multiple (abstract or not) classes but can implements many interfaces. Also the fields can't be private in an interface.

Note that the Oracle documentation suggest to turn fully abstract class into interface.

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