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I have two buttons, which the user can click and will open a FileDiagloag to select a file. I need the user to select two files but I want one function to handle both button calls. So in my init I have:

QtCore.QObject.connect(self.ui.Button_SelectJoinFiles_1, QtCore.SIGNAL('clicked()'), self.SelectLogFileToJoin(1))
QtCore.QObject.connect(self.ui.Button_SelectJoinFiles_2, QtCore.SIGNAL('clicked()'), self.SelectLogFileToJoin(2))

And the function is basically something like:

def SelectLogFileToJoin(self, ButtonNum):
        if(ButtonNum==1):
        ......
        if(ButtonNum==2)
        .....

But this doesn't work because when I start the program it start by giving me a file select dialog.

Could someone please tell me how to handle passing an argument to a callback function?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The issue here is you are passing the value returned by the function, not the function itself. To do what you want, you will want to use functools.partial() to create a new function with pre-filled arguments:

from functools import partial

...

QtCore.QObject.connect(..., partial(self.SelectLogFileToJoin, 1))
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1  
partial is overkill in this case. Closure will be quite enough :) connect(..., lambda: self.SelectLogFileToJoin(1)) –  astynax Jun 13 '12 at 17:19
    
@astynax Overkill? Using a lambda is a less clear way of reinventing the wheel to do what partial is designed to do. –  Lattyware Jun 13 '12 at 17:37
1  
You are recommending to partially apply the function with one argument. :) partial is good for partial applying of function with many (keyword)arguments. And it has significantly lesser efficiency, than lambda. lambda-functions are good candidates for callbacks. And my lambda-closure looks pretty clean (IMHO). –  astynax Jun 13 '12 at 17:51
    
good for? Why not with one argument? Efficiency really isn't an issue - in my tests the difference is 0.03 usec in favour of partial - in any case, it is essentially nothing, and besides, there is no point in premature optimisation. partial() is there for a reason, it makes sense to use it. –  Lattyware Jun 13 '12 at 18:25
1  
May be I just wont to use lambdas in my practice :) This is my FP-way –  astynax Jun 13 '12 at 18:36

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