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Is there a way to have a template specialization based on a range of values instead of just one? I know the following code is not valid C++ code but it shows what I would like to do. I'm writing code for a 8-bit machine, so there is a difference in speed for using ints and chars.

template<unsigned SIZE>
class circular_buffer {
   unsigned char buffer[SIZE];
   unsigned int head; // index
   unsigned int tail; // index
};

template<unsigned SIZE <= 256>
class circular_buffer {
   unsigned char buffer[SIZE];
   unsigned char head; // index
   unsigned char tail; // index
};
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3 Answers

up vote 41 down vote accepted

Try std::conditional:

#include <type_traits>

template<unsigned SIZE>
class circular_buffer {

    typedef typename
        std::conditional< SIZE < 256,
                          unsigned char,
                          unsigned int
                        >::type
        index_type;

    unsigned char buffer[SIZE];
    index_type head;
    index_type tail;
};

If your compiler doesn't yet support this part of C++11, there's equivalent in boost libraries.

Then again, it's easy to roll your own (credit goes to KerrekSB):

template <bool, typename T, typename F>
struct conditional {
    typedef T type;
};

template <typename T, typename F>  // partial specialization on first argument
struct conditional<false, T, F> {
    typedef F type;
}; 
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1  
I have to say, this is useful. –  chris Jun 13 '12 at 16:34
5  
A trait like std::conditional is trivial to write yourself, so you don't really need any libraries if you don't have it: template <bool, typename T, typename> struct conditional { typedef T type; }; template <typename T, typename U> struct conditional<false, T, U> { typedef U type; }; –  Kerrek SB Jun 13 '12 at 21:31
    
Cheers @KerrekSB, I added it to the answer. –  jrok Jun 14 '12 at 10:09
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Use an extra defaulted bool parameter:

// primary template handles false
template<unsigned SIZE, bool IsSmall = SIZE <= 256>
class circular_buffer {
   unsigned char buffer[SIZE];
   unsigned int head; // index
   unsigned int tail; // index
};

// specialization for true
template<unsigned SIZE>
class circular_buffer<SIZE, true> {
   unsigned char buffer[SIZE];
   unsigned char head; // index
   unsigned char tail; // index
};
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I'd be happier if IsSmall = SIZE <= 256 had parens in it somewhere –  Mooing Duck Jun 13 '12 at 16:39
    
@MooingDuck like this? IsSmall = (SIZE <= 256) –  user1203803 Jun 13 '12 at 16:41
2  
@MooingDuck no need. < is less than by default. That's why there is the template disambiguator. Confusingly > is close template by default and you need parens for that. C++ is great, isn't it? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jun 13 '12 at 16:44
2  
@R.MartinhoFernandes: If it was needed I would have edited the question. I just said I'd be happier. You still got the +1 though. –  Mooing Duck Jun 13 '12 at 16:50
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Another possible option:

template <unsigned SIZE>
struct offset_size {
    typedef typename offset_size<SIZE - 1>::type type;
};

template <>
struct offset_size<0> {
    typedef unsigned char type;
};

template <>
struct offset_size<257> {
    typedef unsigned int type;
};

template<unsigned SIZE>
class circular_buffer {
   unsigned char buffer[SIZE];
   typename offset_size<SIZE>::type head; // index
   typename offset_size<SIZE>::type tail; // index
};

(Ideone example)

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5  
You're such a sadist, it's so cruel w.r.t. the compiler. Try to compile offset_size<MAX_INT>, the compiler will have to instantiate billions of template classes! –  valdo Jun 13 '12 at 16:39
    
Indeed, if you're not careful with this technique you will trigger error: template instantiation depth exceeds maximum of ___ (500 by default on gcc). –  cdhowie Jun 13 '12 at 16:42
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