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i have to write in a file 4bytes representing an integer in little endian (java use big endian) because an external c++ application have to read this file. My code don't write anything in te file but de buffer has data inside. why? my funcion:

public static void copy(String fileOutName, boolean append){
    File fileOut = new File (fileOutName);

    try {
         FileChannel wChannel = new FileOutputStream(fileOut, append).getChannel();

         int i = 5;
         ByteBuffer bb = ByteBuffer.allocate(4);
         bb.order(ByteOrder.LITTLE_ENDIAN);
         bb.putInt(i);

         bb.flip();

         int written = wChannel.write(bb);
         System.out.println(written);    

         wChannel.close();
     } catch (IOException e) {
     }
}

my call:

copy("prueba.bin", false);
share|improve this question
7  
don't ignore Exceptions. write e.printStackTrace() in catch block –  alaster Jun 13 '12 at 16:33
    
I tried that code and it wrote the 4 bytes in the file –  Evans Jun 13 '12 at 16:35
1  
This is probably an issue with the non-synchronous IO. The write method does not block, so there's no guarantee it will be completed by the time you call close. And close forces blocked threads to exit immediately, which may abort a write with an exception, which you are ignoring. –  jpm Jun 13 '12 at 16:37

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

When you don't know why something failed, it is a bad idea to ignore exceptions in an empty try-catch block.

Odds are excellent that you are running the program in an environment where the file cannot be created; however, the instructions you gave to handle such an exceptional situation is to do nothing. So, odds are you have a program that attempted to run, but failed with some reason, which was handled by not even displaying the reason to you.

try this

public static void copy(String fileOutName, boolean append){
    File fileOut = new File (fileOutName);

    try {
         FileChannel wChannel = new FileOutputStream(fileOut, append).getChannel();

         int i = 5;
         ByteBuffer bb = ByteBuffer.allocate(4);
         bb.order(ByteOrder.LITTLE_ENDIAN);
         bb.putInt(i);

         bb.flip();

         int written = wChannel.write(bb);
         System.out.println(written);    

         wChannel.close();
     } catch (IOException e) {
// this is the new line of code
         e.printStackTrace();
     }
}

And I'll bet you find out why it doesn't work right away.

share|improve this answer
    
I'd use e.printStackTrace() rather than println so that you can get more context. –  templatetypedef Jun 13 '12 at 16:52
    
@templatetypedef Sure, I'll update the post. –  Edwin Buck Jun 13 '12 at 16:53
    
Thanks, i forgot this. There wasn't any problem only that integer 5 in binary was a blank character and if i change the value of the 'i' variable to 54564645, %ó@ is the result :p –  abogarill Jun 14 '12 at 15:31

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