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I have an application that stores configuration files as XML on disk. I'd like to reduce the risk of data file corruption in the case of crashing etc. It seems like the common recommendation is to use SQLite.

What is your opinion on just using BLOBs to store the current XML format? The table would look like:

CREATE TABLE t ( filename TEXT, filedata BLOB )

On the one hand, this seems inelegant, but on the other it would avoid all the work (and corresponding bugs) of converting the configuration to an appropriate format.

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Sounds inefficient. You'll need to load and parse the blob to get your configuration values as well as save the entire configuration file for every change. –  Mike Jun 13 '12 at 17:00
    
That's true with the filesystem, too. Config is kept in memory during operation, and config read/write operations are infrequent. –  Rodrigo Queiro Jun 13 '12 at 17:06

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Sounds inefficient. You'll need to load and parse the BLOB to get your configuration values as well as save the entire configuration file for every change.

I'm assuming the reason you're switching to a SQLite database is because the transaction mechanism will give you some amount of fault tolerance to crashes. If you store each of your configuration files as one BLOB then you will need to save then entire file before the transaction completes as opposed to just saving the updated values which should be quicker.

In addition if you're using a DOM based XML parser you'll end up loading both the BLOB and the parsed DOM tree into memory at the same time. Depending on the size and number of your configuration files that could be resource intensive.

IMHO you're better off creating a table for each configuration files with a row for each of your configuration values. You'll get better read/write performance, less memory usage and be able to use all the relational mechanisms of SQLite.

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