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I have this consumer targeted application that has built in error reporting. Sometimes I get error reports for exceptions like the remote name could not be resolved on host names like google.com for example. Which obviously is not a problem in my application, but rather on the users end.

How can I, in my application, categorize certain Exceptions and instead of offer sending an error report, show a dialog suggesting the user to check certain things on his/her end. Also taking into account the fact that users have localized .NET framework installations. (Error messages in their language)

EDIT: It's really not a question about separating SQLException from WebException, it's more how I can determine a WebException of type remote name could not be resolved from WebException The operation has timed-out for example.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

You want to use try/catch statement with multiple catch blocks:

try { ... connect... }
catch(SocketException ex) { 
  switch(ex.ErrorCode)
  {
    case 123: ....
    default: ....
  }
}
catch(WebException ex) { 
  if(ex.InnerException is SocketException)
  {
    switch(((SocketException)ex.InnerException).ErrorCode)
    {
      case 123: ....
      default: ....
    }
  }
  switch(ex.Status)
  {
    case 500: ....
    default: ....
  }
}
....
catch(Exception ex) { .... something unforeseen, send error report .... }

Basically, each one of those exception should contain additional information in properties that you can check without relying on string comparisons.

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Please see the updated question – Magnus Jun 13 '12 at 18:27
    
@Magnus And in turn, please see the updated answer. – Mr. TA Jun 13 '12 at 19:32

In the case of a WebException you can determine wether the error is an HTTP error (ie: 404) or not using the "Status" property.

catch (WebException ex)
{
    if (ex.Status != WebExceptionStatus.ProtocolError)
       // in this case it was probably a connection issue
}

You can find more details on the WebExceptionStatus enum here.

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I highly recommend taking a look at the Enterprise Library Exception Handling Application Block.

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Catch the exception (and innerexception, if needed) by type where possible OR When not typed with enough specificity, additionally check the message or any other exception details (error codes/number/etc) THEN Handle this case appropriately by triggering the correct user-facing dialogs.

Some pseudocode of a function:

public UserError DoStuff()
{
 try
 {
  // some web code
  // some sql code
 }
 catch (WebException webEx)
 {
   if (webEx.Message.Contains("SSL"))
   {
     return new UserError { Type = ErrorType.SSL };
   }

   return new UserError { Type = ErrorType.Web };
 }
 catch (SqlException sqlEx)
 {
    return new UserError { Type = ErrorType.SQL };
 }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Please see the updated question – Magnus Jun 13 '12 at 18:27
    
Hey, Magnus, I think parsing the message itself still gives you this ability (the Contains method call) on any exception type but depending on the exception type you can also access numeric based exception codes. Both SQL and Web have them, as others have detailed above. – Matt Kerr Jul 16 '12 at 22:54

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