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I am implementing a certain algorithm in a single method in Java. This algorithm needs a data structure that will not be used anywhere else, so it seems appropriate to me to use a local class. The last step of the algorithm needs to iterate through all of the objects that were created earlier in the method, so I thought I would make the constructor for the local class add the newly created object to a list. In Java, a local class can access local variables declared final. So I tried something like this:

public void doThing() {

    class Foo {
        public Foo() {
            fooList.add(this);  // FAILS: "cannot find symbol: variable fooList"
        }
    }

    final ArrayList<Foo> fooList = new ArrayList<Foo>();

    // algorithm goes here, instantiating some Foo objects:
    Foo foo = new Foo();
    // etc.

    // now iterate through all the Foo objects that were created
    for (Foo f : fooList)
        System.out.println(f);
}

This fails because apparently I have to have fooList declared before I can reference it inside the local class. Okay, fine, I thought, I'll just declare fooList at the beginning of the method:

public void doThing() {

    final ArrayList<Foo> fooList;  // FAILS: "cannot find symbol: class Foo"

    class Foo {
        public Foo() {
            fooList.add(this);
        }
    }

    fooList = new ArrayList<Foo>();

    Foo foo = new Foo();
    for (Foo f : fooList)
        System.out.println(f);
}

But this fails too, because apparently I need to have the class Foo defined before I refer to it. So how do I break this circular dependency?

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If you are creating classes internal to a method and using lists of that class then you are doing your design wrong. Maybe you should add an external class to do this. It sounds like the beginnings of a 1000 line method to me... –  Triton Man Jun 13 '12 at 17:26

2 Answers 2

So how do I break this circular dependency?

I'd strongly suggest just breaking out the local class into a private static nested class. I can't say I've ever seen a pleasant use of a named class declared inside a method. While I generally applaud the "it's only used in one method" part, by the time you've declared the class, the method is already getting to a medium length.

Of course, you could always use a raw type for the declaration and just cast later... that would probably work, but obviously it would be horrible.

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One of the reasons I thought it would be useful to use a local class is that the methods in Foo need to use four local variables in the doThing() method (one of which is fooList, but there are three others). I could pass all four of these as parameters to every method that needs them, but I thought I could avoid such circumlocutions by using a local class. Maybe not, though? –  Brian Kell Jun 13 '12 at 17:47
    
@BrianKell: It sounds like you've got too much work in your method. Can you not pass them into the constructor of the class, and give the class a method to work on them? –  Jon Skeet Jun 13 '12 at 18:33

An alternative:

class Foo {
    public Foo(ArrayList<Foo> fooList) {
        fooList.add(this);
    }
    public Foo() {
    }
}

public void doThing() {
    final ArrayList<Foo> fooList = new ArrayList<Foo>();

    Foo foo = new Foo(fooList);

    // or simply fooList.add(new Foo());


    for (Foo f : fooList)
        System.out.println(f);
}

I think it's a bad idea to add references to list this way. In this case you can simply write new Foo(fooList); and reference will be in list, but you are not saving reference in your method. It depends on what are you trying to do, so use the most comfortable variant

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you can give list to the constructor. Or call fooList.add(foo); in doThing() –  alaster Jun 13 '12 at 17:26
    
there is no need to make class local, it makes no sense. But ArrayList must be unical. I edited my answer –  alaster Jun 13 '12 at 17:30
    
You're right, I could also pass fooList as a parameter to the constructor; that's a good idea. It feels like the purpose of local classes being able to access local variables is so that you don't have to do this, but oh well. –  Brian Kell Jun 13 '12 at 17:31
    
I could also explicitly call fooList.add(foo); every time I instantiate a Foo. But that seems like a lot of copy-pasting, and I think I would probably forget to do that somewhere, which would result in a Foo being instantiated without being added to the list. –  Brian Kell Jun 13 '12 at 17:33
    
you can write initializing and adding to list in one line (I prefer this variant). Also you can provide list passing it to constructor (not good variant, but it can be). See edited constructor –  alaster Jun 13 '12 at 17:35

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