Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a collection of Objective-C classes that get sub-classed at a variety of different depths by a variety of different classes. Once the entire object is initialized (all of the sub-classes init functions have finished), I need to run an "Update Cache" method which then gets Overridden by the sub-classes as needed.

My Problem: With a variety of different inheritance depths to my class tree, there is no one place where I can put [self UpdateCache] and I can be sure that there is no sub-class that has not been initialized. The only possible solution would be to call [super init] after the initialization of each class so that the parent class is always called last. I want to avoid this as this goes against all guidelines of writing Objective-C. Is there any clean solution to this problem?

Here is an some example code:

@interface ClassA : NSObject

-(void)UpdateCache
@end

@interface ClassB : ClassA

-(void)UpdateCache
@end

@interface ClassC : ClassB

-(void)UpdateCache
@end

Now for the implementation we need to somehow get UpdateCahce to be called after we know all sub classes have initialized regardless of which class has been initialized

@implementation A
-(id)init
{
   if(self = [super init])
   {
       // Placing [self UpdateCache] here would make it be called prior to 
       // B and C's complete init function from being called.
   }
}

-(void)UpdateCache
{

}


@end

@implementation B
-(id)init
{
   if(self = [super init])
   {
       // Placing [self UpdateCache] would result in UpdateChache not being
       // called if you initialized an instance of Class A
   }
}

-(void)UpdateCache
{
   [super UpdateCache];
}

@end

@implementation C
-(id)init
{
   if(self = [super init])
   {
       // Placing [self UpdateCache] would result in UpdateChache not 
       //being called if you initialized an instance of Class A or B
   }
}

-(void)UpdateCache
{
   [super UpdateCache];
}

@end
share|improve this question
    
At the risk of sounding stupid... is it a huge problem to just call [yourObj updateCache]; per instance, after you've allocated and initialized it? –  MechEthan Jun 13 '12 at 18:15
    
Your description is not easy to understand. "Once the entire object is initialized"? Do you mean the entire class tree? Is updateCache a method or a function? Is it a class method, or is it an instance method that each subclass implements? Why does an instance care about other classes in the tree -- i.e., why can't you just call this method at the end of init in each of your subclasses? –  Josh Caswell Jun 13 '12 at 18:18
    
@HachiEthan - This is the solution I am currently using, but I was looking for something cleaner. I actually have had this same problem show up in a variety of places and I wanted to see if there was any general solution to it –  David Jun 13 '12 at 18:47
    
@JoshCaswell - This update cache function is a very expensive operation which is why its results are being cached. Calling it at every step would cause the information to be generated up to 4 times for the same data if I did it in every subclass. –  David Jun 13 '12 at 18:49
    
What you're describing still isn't clear. You say it's a "function" (should be "method", I assume) that's being "overridden by the sub-classes", but you also seem to be saying that it needs to be called only once for the entire class tree. Your description is confused and you haven't addressed any of the issues in my original comment. Please elaborate more on your design and be more specific; perhaps post some dummy code. –  Josh Caswell Jun 13 '12 at 19:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Do your sub-classes require unique init method signatures? (e.g. sub-class specific parameters required to initialize the object) If not, following a simple factory-like design pattern may work fine.

Example of what to add your parent/base class:

+(id)buildSelf {
    YourParentClass* obj = [[[self alloc] init] autorelease];
    if (obj) {
        [obj updateCache];
    }
    return obj;
}

Add parameters to it, for all sub-classes to use, if needed.

Again, if your sub-classes need to support unique init method signatures then this won't work so well.

share|improve this answer
    
See the revised code example. I don't think this addresses the root of the problem. –  David Jun 13 '12 at 19:39
    
@David It should work fine... I ran it through a test before posting to be sure. Calling [[self alloc] init] in the parent class will, by default, call the the topmost derived class's init method if one exists. Same for updateCache. Ain't polymorphism great? ;D This is very similar to your current solution of manually calling updateCache after you instantiate. –  MechEthan Jun 13 '12 at 20:19
    
@David That being said, I would 100% go with Adam Leonard's answer because its more flexible and follows a common practice for cached data. Use a dirty-flag to quickly abort updateCache if its not dirty, and always call updateCache before accessing the cache/data it's updating. –  MechEthan Jun 13 '12 at 20:28
    
It took me a while to understand what you were getting at, but this is correct. You essentially need a separate method which is overridden does not call [Super X]. –  David Jun 13 '12 at 21:17
    
@David yep! exactly. My example +(id)buildSelf method should only exist in the parent class. Also, you may want to take additional steps to help avoid sub-classes from being instantiated in other ways. –  MechEthan Jun 13 '12 at 21:22

Rather than updating the cache right after init, why not instead update it right before it is first used? Perhaps you can have an boolean instance variable cacheIsDirty which you set to TRUE in init. Then, your getter for the cache calls updateCache first if the cache is dirty. Assuming that you're always using getters and never using the instance variable directly (which is good practice in Objective-C) clients shouldn't notice a difference.

share|improve this answer
    
This is probably the best suggestion, since it seems like the only other thing that would work would be to maintatin a list of the subclasses. –  Josh Caswell Jun 13 '12 at 19:44

Declare a virtual method and call it when you need it....

and since this is objective c see Implement a pure virtual method in Objective-C

share|improve this answer
    
I don't believe this solves my problem. The issue here is when to call the [self UpdateCache] function, as the last init function to run will be variable based on how many child classes are left to init. The same class my or may not be subclassed by a variety of different classes so there is no correct place to place the call. If I have misunderstood your answer, please let me know and clarify how this solves it. –  David Jun 13 '12 at 17:51

Yes, I asked a similar question a while back... You can add a 'hook' / 'proxy' to an instance of an object to override the -forwardInvocation: selector and perform what you want. The original question is here, and my answer on it is the accepted one.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.