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Take a look at these two functions:

void function1() {
    int x;
    int y;
    int z;
    int *ret;
}

void function2() {
    char buffer1[4];
    char buffer2[4];
    char buffer3[4];
    int *ret;
}

If I break at function1() in gdb, and print the addresses of the variables, I get this:

(gdb) p &x  
$1 = (int *) 0xbffff380
(gdb) p &y
$2 = (int *) 0xbffff384
(gdb) p &z
$3 = (int *) 0xbffff388
(gdb) p &ret
$4 = (int **) 0xbffff38c

If I do the same thing at function2(), I get this:

(gdb) p &buffer1
$1 = (char (*)[4]) 0xbffff388
(gdb) p &buffer2
$2 = (char (*)[4]) 0xbffff384
(gdb) p &buffer3
$3 = (char (*)[4]) 0xbffff380
(gdb) p &ret
$4 = (int **) 0xbffff38c

You'll notice that in both functions, ret is stored closest to the top of the stack. In function1(), it is followed by z, y, and finally x. In function2(), ret is followed by buffer1, then buffer2 and buffer3. Why is the storage order changed? We're using the same amount of memory in both cases (4 byte ints vs 4 byte char arrays), so it can't be an issue of padding. What reasons could there be for this reordering, and furthermore, is it possible by looking at the C code to determine ahead of time how the local variables will be ordered?

Now I'm aware that the ANSI spec for C says nothing about the order that local variables are stored in and that the compiler is allowed to chose its own order, but I would imagine that the compiler has rules as to how it takes care of this, and explanations as to why those rules were made to be as they are.

For reference I'm using GCC 4.0.1 on Mac OS 10.5.7

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is it important? do you need the variables to be allocated in specific address? –  stefanB Jul 9 '09 at 6:09
5  
No, its not important, merely an academic exercise. –  David Jul 9 '09 at 6:11
    
Does the level of optimisation affect the answer? Pure guess, but maybe with no/low optimisation, ints are candidates for register allocation but char[4] isn't, and since they're processed differently, the two mechanisms just so happen to put them on the stack in different orders. Even if optimization makes no difference, it's plausible that something else in the way automatics are handled means that ints always go down one route, and arrays always down another. –  Steve Jessop Jul 9 '09 at 9:30

8 Answers 8

Not only does ISO C say nothing about the ordering of local variables on the stack, it doesn't even guarantee that a stack even exists. The standard just talks about the scope and lifetime of variables inside a block.

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I've no idea why GCC organizes its stack the way it does (though I guess you could crack open its source or this paper and find out), but I can tell you how to guarantee the order of specific stack variables if for some reason you need to. Simply put them in a struct:

void function1() {
    struct {
        int x;
        int y;
        int z;
        int *ret;
    } locals;
}

If my memory serves me correctly, spec guarantees that &ret > &z > &y > &x. I left my K&R at work so I can't quote chapter and verse though.

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What part of this uses C++ syntax? This is valid in C89 and later. –  ephemient Jul 9 '09 at 17:36
    
Oh, it has anonymous structs now? I never know what tiny difference between C and C++ syntax the pedants will find to jump down my throat with. Anyway, fixed. –  Crashworks Jul 9 '09 at 18:18
1  
As far as I recall (though I don't have a standard with me), anonymous structs, unions, and enums are legal in ANSI C. MSVC used to have conniptions over them, though; I'm not sure when that got fixed. –  ephemient Jul 9 '09 at 18:36

Usually it has to do with alignment issues.

Most processors are slower at fetching data that isn't processor-word aligned. They have to grab it in pieces and splice it together.

Probably what's happening is it's putting all of the objects which are bigger than or equal to the processor optimal alignment together, and then packing more tightly the things which may not be aligned. It just so happens that in your example all of your char arrays are 4 bytes, but I bet if you make them 3 bytes, they'll still end up in the same places.

But if you had four one-byte arrays, they may end up in one 4-byte range, or aligned in four separate ones.

It's all about what's easiest (translates to "fastest") for the processor to grab.

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Well, here GCC is aligning the stack at 16 bytes by default. Also, even if we were dealing with a 4 byte alignment, the arrays and the integers are the same size (4 bytes a piece), so I don't know why you'd get reordering. –  David Jul 9 '09 at 6:14

So, I did some more experimenting and here's what I found. It seems to be based on whether or not each variable is an array. Given this input:

void f5() {
        int w;
        int x[1];
        int *ret;
        int y;
        int z[1];
}

I end up with this in gdb:

(gdb) p &w
$1 = (int *) 0xbffff4c4
(gdb) p &x
$2 = (int (*)[1]) 0xbffff4c0
(gdb) p &ret 
$3 = (int **) 0xbffff4c8
(gdb) p &y
$4 = (int *) 0xbffff4cc
(gdb) p &z
$5 = (int (*)[1]) 0xbffff4bc

In this case, ints and pointers are dealt with first, last declared on the top of the stack and first declared closer to the bottom. Then arrays are handled, in the opposite direction, the earlier the declaration, the highest up on the stack. I'm sure there's a good reason for this. I wonder what it is.

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My guess is that this has something to do with how the data are loaded into registers. Perhaps, with char arrays, the compiler works some magic to do things in parallel and this has something to do with the position in memory to easily load the data into registers. Try compiling with different levels of optimization, and try using int buffer1[1] instead.

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It could also be a security issue?

int main()
{
    int array[10];
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i <= 10; ++i)
    {
        array[i] = 0;
    }
}

If array is lower on the stack than i, this code will loop infinitely (because it mistakenly accesses and zeroes array[10], which is i). By placing array higher on the stack, attempts to access memory beyond the end of the stack will be more likely to touch unallocated memory, and crash, rather than causing undefined behavior.

I experimented with this same code one time with gcc, and was not able to make it fail except with a particular combination of flags that I do not remember now.. In any case, it placed array several bytes away from i.

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Not likely. There are guard pages for stack overflow and underflow, but nothing between stack frames. –  lavinio Jul 9 '09 at 6:13
    
The security issue here is incorrect code. Yes, it results in a infinite loop with one particular compiler/flags combo. But to me, that's a cold comfort. –  Matthew Flaschen Jul 9 '09 at 6:23

Interestingly if you add an extra int *ret2 in function1 then on my system the order is correct whereas its out of order for just 3 local variables. My guess is it's ordered that way due to reflect the register allocation strategy that will be used. Either that or it's arbitrary.

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It's completely up to the compiler. Beyond this, certain procedure variables might never be placed on the stack at all, as they can spend their whole lives within a register.

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