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I have a VS solution that contains multiple projects and I'm trying to create a build definition to build only one of them.

My project structure in TFS is like this:

    $myproject/Dev                            --- myproject.sln file is here
    $myproject/Dev/Src/category/item/project1 --- project I want to build
    $myproject/Dev/Src/web/item/project2      --- project2
    $myproject/Dev/Src/service/item/project3  --- project3

project1 has a project reference set to project2

Then I set up my build definition like this:

   1. In the Workspace tab

    Status   Source Control Folder                        Build Agent Folder
    --------------------------------------------------------------------
    Active   $/myproject/Dev/Src/category/item/project1   $(SourceDir)\Dev\Src\category\item\project1

In the Process tab, Items to Build | Projects to Build, I select only project1 to build. When I build I get an error:

c:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework64\v4.0.30319\Microsoft.Common.targets (1200): The referenced project '..\..\..\web\item\project2.csproj' does not exist.

If I set the Source Control Folder to $/myproject/Dev and Build Agent Folder to $(SourceDir)\Dev then everything is fine but I only want to kick off the build when something is checked into project1 folder, not everything under $/myproject/Dev.

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Does project1 depend on other projects? It looks like it depends on project2. Try to check your project dependencies. –  Morten Frederiksen Jun 13 '12 at 18:50
    
Can you please explain why you want to build just Project 1 and not it's referenced projects? –  DaveShaw Jun 13 '12 at 20:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If project1 reference project2 (as you stated), how do you expect project1 to compile without project2 being previously compiled ?

If you only want to compile project1 then you need an assembly reference and not a project reference to project2.

But don't bother, in your build definition build project1 and its dependencies, it's simple and efficient.

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