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In an effort to lean Rx I'm writing a simple application which imitates reading a file and supports cancellation.

It works like this:

  • When the user presses the "Run" button the program

    • shows the busy indicator,
    • reads a file in chunks, which is a long process, reporting the length of each one,
    • hides the busy indicator when the reading process is finished (or canceled, see below).
  • If the user presses the "Cancel" button the file reading process gets canceled.

  • If the user presses the "Run" button while a previous operation is still in progress, the previous operation gets canceled and a new one starts.

I'm looking for a way to implement this with minimum glue code while still maintaining the look of a simple sequence of synchronous operations in which the natural control flow is easily seen.

The main problem seems to be hiding the busy indicator when the inner observable (the reader) finishes, the outer observable being the "Run" click event sequence.

So far I came up with these two versions of the main piece of the program:

subscriber-based:

IObservable<byte[]> xs =
   runClick
   .Do((Action<EventPattern<EventArgs>>)(_ => ShowBusy(true)))
   .Do(_ => ShowError(false))
   .Select(_ =>
      reader
      .TakeUntil(cancelClick)
      .Publish(ob =>
      {
         ob.Subscribe(
            b => { },
            ex =>
            {
               Console.WriteLine("ERROR: " + ex);
               ShowBusy(false);
               ShowError(true);
            },
            () => ShowBusy(false));
         return ob;
      }))
   .Switch();
xs = xs.Catch<byte[], Exception>(e => xs);

and concat-based:

IObservable<byte[]> xs =
   runClick
   .Do((Action<EventPattern<EventArgs>>)(_ => ShowBusy(true)))
   .Do(_ => ShowError(false))
   .Select(_ =>
      reader
      .TakeUntil(cancelClick)
      .DoAfter(() =>
         ShowBusy(false)))
   .Switch();
xs = xs.Catch<byte[], Exception>(e =>
{
   Console.WriteLine("ERROR: " + e);
   ShowBusy(false);
   ShowError(true);
   return xs;
});

with one custom method DoAfter

public static IObservable<T> DoAfter<T>(this IObservable<T> observable, Action action)
{
   IObservable<T> appended = observable.Concat(
      Observable.Create<T>(o =>
      {
         try
         {
            action();
         }
         catch (Exception ex)
         {
            o.OnError(ex);
            return Disposable.Empty;
         }

         o.OnCompleted();
         return Disposable.Empty;
      }));
   return appended;
}

(see the whole application code here).

Neither implementation satisfies me completely: the first is rather verbose, the second forces me to write my own method for a rather simple task which I would expect to be covered by standard means. Am I missing something?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It turned out what I was missing was an overload of the Do method. I can use it instead of my custom DoAfter method and then the code looks good.

IObservable<byte[]> xs =
   runClick
   .Do((Action<EventPattern<EventArgs>>)(_ => ShowBusy(true)))
   .Do(_ => ShowError(false))
   .Select(_ =>
      reader
      .TakeUntil(cancelClick)
      .Do(
         b => { },
         ex =>
         {
            Console.WriteLine("ERROR: " + ex);
            ShowBusy(false);
            ShowError(true);
         },
         () => ShowBusy(false)
      ))
   .Switch();
xs = xs.Catch<byte[], Exception>(e => xs);
share|improve this answer
    
FYI, in my experience, a Catch like this one will only handle one error. Subsequent errors are not caught (because the resulting observable from the Catch behavior doesn't have a Catch behavior itself). You might want to look at Retry. –  Anderson Imes Jun 14 '12 at 14:11
    
@AndersonImes: It works well, actually. Handles an infinite amount of errors. Could it be that the authors of Rx changed the behavior in 2.0? –  Gebb Jun 14 '12 at 15:26
    
perhaps! I hadn't tried it with 2.0. I'll give it a shot, thanks! –  Anderson Imes Jun 14 '12 at 15:36
1  
I think the "infinite errors" stems from the fact that you are resubscribing to the Catch observable when an error is thrown. By the time the lambda passed to Catch is called, xs contains the Catch observable itself, thus causing resubscription on error. –  Gideon Engelberth Jun 14 '12 at 16:13

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