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I can't seem to call the setter of an overridden property in a derived class from the base class. This seems like something that one should be able to do, but I am clearly missing something. In the DisplayQuestion method of the SearchSurveyBase class below, this line does not appear to do any setting:

VisibleQuestions.Add(sqc.SurveyQuestion.ID);

VisibleQuestions is an abstract List that is being overridden in a derived class. The getters seem to work fine from the base; I can see them being hit on the derived class when debugging. However, the setter does not appear to be working at all. The getter is called fine, but the setter never sets. What am I missing here? Is there a better way to do this?

Base Class:

public abstract class SearchSurveyBase : System.Web.UI.UserControl
{
    public abstract List<int> VisibleQuestions { get; set; }

    public abstract void SetupControls();

    protected void AddQuestion(Accordion accSection, Question question)
    {
        SearchQuestionControl searchQuestionControl = GetQuestionControl(question.ControlType);

        if (searchQuestionControl != null)
        {
            //QuestionVisible is a method that checks to see if the object's id is in the VisibleQuestions list
            searchQuestionControl.Visible = QuestionVisible(question);

            if (!searchQuestionControl.Visible)
            {
                string btnID = "lb_" + accSection.ID.ToString() + "_" + accSection.Panes.Count;
                LinkButton btn = new LinkButton();
                btn.ID = btnID;
                btn.Text = question.Text;
                btn.CommandArgument = questionPane.ID;
                btn.Command += new CommandEventHandler(DisplayQuestion);
                questionPane.HeaderContainer.Controls.Add(btn);
            }

            questionPane.ContentContainer.Controls.Add(searchQuestionControl);
            searchQuestionControlList.Add(searchQuestionControl);
        }
        accSection.Panes.Add(questionPane);
    }

    private void DisplayQuestion(object sender, CommandEventArgs e)
    {
        SearchQuestionControl sqc = null;
        AccordionPane pane = (AccordionPane)UIUtilities.FindControlRecursive(RootControl, e.CommandArgument.ToString());
        if (pane != null && pane.ContentContainer.HasControls() && pane.ContentContainer.Controls[0] is SearchQuestionControl)
        {
            sqc = (SearchQuestionControl)pane.ContentContainer.Controls[0];
        }

        if (sqc != null)
        {
            if (!sqc.Visible)
            {
                //Removed a bunch of lines that aren't relevant to the question per request.
                VisibleQuestions.Add(sqc.SurveyQuestion.ID);
            }
        }
    }
}

Derived Class:

public partial class SearchSurveyAccordion : SearchSurveyBase
{
    override public List<int> VisibleQuestions
    {
        get
        {
            // hfVisibleQuestions is a HiddenField control on the .ascx page that inherits this class.
            if (!string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(hfVisibleQuestions.Value))
            {
                string[] vals = hfVisibleQuestions.Value.Split(',');
                List<int> vqs = new List<int>(Array.ConvertAll<string, int>(vals, (x => Convert.ToInt32(x))));
                return vqs;
            }
            else
            {
                return new List<int>();
            }
        }
        set
        {
            hfVisibleQuestions.Value = string.Join(",", value.Select(n => n.ToString()).ToArray());
        }
    }

    // This method is called during the Page_Init of the page that is consuming this user control.
    override public void SetupControls()
    {
        if (base.survey != null && base.survey.QuestionList != null && base.survey.QuestionList.Count > 0)
        {
            BuildAccordion(base.survey.QuestionList);
        }
    }

    private void BuildAccordion(List<Question> questionList)
    {
        Accordion accSection = null;
        foreach (Question question in questionList)
        {
            accSection = base.AddSection(accSurvey, defaultSectionHeader);
            AddQuestion(accSection, question);
        }
    }
}

TL;DR? Here's the short version of the problem.

I have a base class and a derived class. I want a method in the base class to be able to set the value of an abstract property that is overridden in the derived class but it isn't working for me.

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3  
That is a lot of code. can't you summarized it a bit? –  gdoron Jun 13 '12 at 18:00
    
I was trying to make sure I included everything that's relevant. I'll trim it down some. –  IchibanChef Jun 13 '12 at 18:07
    
In your case, you don't need the set {}. The answers below explain why. –  Tisho Jun 13 '12 at 18:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you are expecting the following statment to call the setter for VisibleQuestions, then you are mistaken:

VisibleQuestions.Add(sqc.SurveyQuestion.ID);

This statement calls the Add method on the List<int> instance returned by the VisibleQuestions getter.

Utilizing the setter would happen if you assigned a value to VisibleQuestions, like so:

VisibleQuestions = new List<int>();
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I am completely appalled at myself for missing this. Thanks. Technically all of the responses to this are "right" in one way or another, but you get the kudos for being first. –  IchibanChef Jun 13 '12 at 19:43

You are not calling the setter on that line. You are calling the getter that returns a list to which you add an element. However next time you access the same getter you create a new list (without the added element) which you return anew

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From MSDN - Using Properties (C# Programming Guide) - The set Accessor:

When you assign a value to the property, the set accessor is invoked by using an argument that provides the new value.

The setter is only called if you actually set your property's value. In your case, you are calling your getter, which returns a new list, based on the value of the underlying field. If you want to then update that underlying field after you update the list, you will need to then set the value of the property to your updated list, like so:

// Calls the getter and returns a new list
List<string> questions = VisibleQuestions; 

// Updates the list, but does not trigger the setter
questions.Add(sqc.SurveyQuestion.ID); 

// Calls the setter
VisibleQuestions = questions;
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