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Please have a look at below given code.

<?php
class Bar 
{
    public function test() {
        $this->testPrivate();
        $this->testPublic();
    }

    public function testPublic() {
        echo "Bar::testPublic\n";
    }

    private function testPrivate() {
        echo "Bar::testPrivate\n";
    }
}

class Foo extends Bar 
{
    public function testPublic() {
        echo "Foo::testPublic\n";
    }

    private function testPrivate() {
        echo "Foo::testPrivate\n";
    }
}

$myFoo = new foo();
$myFoo->test(); // Bar::testPrivate 
                // Foo::testPublic
?> 

In above example, when we called $myFoo->test();it called testPrivate of Bar class But how come it called testPublic of Foo class.

Can any one help me in this ?

share|improve this question

Bar.testPrivate and Foo.testPrivate have to be protected methods instead of private ones. See here for more:

http://php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.visibility.php

share|improve this answer

Because test() is NOT in Foo and is running in Bar scope. Bar scope can't access to Foo private methods. Just add test() to Foo...

share|improve this answer
    
then why it could access testPublic() of Foo , as testPublic of foo is not in Bar scope? – Poonam Bhatt Jun 17 '12 at 11:20
    
PHP tries to access as possible. Foo just extends Bar::test() not copies it! So test() is running in its owner scope (Bar) but as PHP tries to access methods as possible, it uses Foo::testPublic() which exists and accessible FOR Bar but testPrivate is not accessible FOR Foo... – AHHP Jun 29 '12 at 15:31

Indeed one of the comments on the visibility page does reiterate this:

"private methods never participate in the in the overriding because these methods are not visible in the child classes."

It does feel a bit strange because you would think that the child class would override the parent with the method names being the same, but its not the case with private methods and the parents method takes precidence here, so best to use protected methods if you want to override.

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