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I want to detect when a user is missing a required module and print a friendly error message explaining what they need to install.

So far I tried putting this at the beginning of my script:

eval {
    use IO::Uncompress::Gunzip qw(gunzip $GunzipError) ;
};
if ($@) {
    die "Error: IO::Uncompress::Gunzip not installed: $@";
}

But Perl seems to die on the "use" line instead of the "die" line and never prints my error message.

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possible duplicate of How can I check if I have a Perl module before using it? –  mob Jun 13 '12 at 18:50

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

What's happening here is that the module is being used at compile-time, regardless of the fact that it is inside the eval block.

This is also why naab's suggestion to change from eval BLOCK form to eval EXPR form works as well; the expression is evaluated at run-time. Changing the use to require will attempt to load the module at run-time:

eval {
    require IO::Uncompress::Gunzip;
    IO::Uncompress::Gunzip->import( qw/gunzip $GunzipError/ ) ;
};
if ($@) {
    die "Error: IO::Uncompress::Gunzip not installed: $@";
}

Output

Error: IO::Uncompress::Gunzip not installed: Can't locate IO/Uncompress/Gunzip.pm in @INC (@INC contains: C:/Perl/site/lib C:/Perl/lib .) at - line 2.

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There's no need to move the loading to run-time, and you don't want to move the loading to run-time. If you do, you'll get strict errors accessing $GunzipError. –  ikegami Jun 13 '12 at 18:48
    
@ikegami : Works for me (it's been qw//-ed) –  Zaid Jun 13 '12 at 18:56
    
Then your test is broken. Global symbol "$GunzipError" requires explicit package name at -e line 1 is received from perl -e'use strict; eval { require IO::Uncompress::Gunzip; IO::Uncompress::Gunzip->import( qw/gunzip $GunzipError/ ); }; die $@ if $@; $GunzipError;' –  ikegami Jun 13 '12 at 18:59
    
(You would also have problems if gunzip had a prototype, but it doesn't.) –  ikegami Jun 13 '12 at 19:01
    
@ikegami : Do you mean to say that wrapping your test in a BEGIN block would render $GunzipError defined or exempt from strictures? –  Zaid Jun 13 '12 at 19:08
use IO::Uncompress::Gunzip qw( gunzip $GunzipError );

is short for

BEGIN {
   require IO::Uncompress::Gunzip;
   import IO::Uncompress::Gunzip qw( gunzip $GunzipError );
}

and BEGIN blocks are evaluated as soon as they are compiled. That means your code does:

  1. Compilation phase:
    1. Compile eval statement.
      1. Compiled BEGIN block.
        1. Compile require IO::Uncompress::Gunzip;
        2. Compile import IO::Uncompress::Gunzip qw( gunzip $GunzipError );
      2. Evaluate BEGIN block.
        1. Evaluate require IO::Uncompress::Gunzip;
        2. Evaluate import IO::Uncompress::Gunzip qw( gunzip $GunzipError );
    2. Compile if statement.
  2. Run phase:
    1. Evaluate (empty) eval statement.
    2. Evaluate if statement.

If an exception happens in step 1.1.2.1, the eval run in step 2.1 won't catch it!


Solutions:

You started with something equivalent to

BEGIN {
   require IO::Uncompress::Gunzip;
   import IO::Uncompress::Gunzip qw( gunzip $GunzipError );
}

It's errors from require you want to catch, so just add an eval around the require:

BEGIN {
   eval { require IO::Uncompress::Gunzip }
      or die "Error: IO::Uncompress::Gunzip not installed: $@";

   import IO::Uncompress::Gunzip qw( gunzip $GunzipError );
}

You could also delay the use getting compiled (and thus evaluated) by using eval EXPR instead of eval BLOCK:

BEGIN {
   eval 'use IO::Uncompress::Gunzip qw( gunzip $GunzipError ); 1'
      or die "Error: IO::Uncompress::Gunzip not installed: $@";
}

(I wish there was a good way of finding out if a module is installed. Even the first solution will catch other errors, the second even more.)

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If you use eval in { } it will proc an error.

To fill the $@ arg, use :

eval 'use IO::Uncompress::Gunzip qw(gunzip $GunzipError)';

then the $@ will be set.

Good day.

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1  
Hmm, I'm confused. The docs (perldoc.perl.org/functions/eval.html) seem to imply I can use brackets e.g., eval { $answer = $a / $b; }; warn $@ if $@; –  Greg Jun 13 '12 at 18:22
    
It does seem to work but I now get this message: Use of uninitialized value in concatenation (.) or string –  Greg Jun 13 '12 at 18:24
    
if you only want to test if the package is installed, no need to use the qw stuff. a : eval "use IO::Uncompress::Gunzip"; die "error : $@" if ($@); will do the job –  naab Jun 13 '12 at 18:34
1  
@Greg You get that error because you are substituting $GunzipError, which is not defined at the time this line is executed. Escape the $ (change it to \$) or use single-quotes instead of double-quotes. –  cdhowie Jun 13 '12 at 18:43
    
Fixed by changing the quotes. –  ikegami Jun 13 '12 at 18:49

check out Class::Load's try_load_class (CPAN)

use Class::Load;
die "Error: IO::Uncompress::Gunzip not installed" if 
    (! try_load_class (IO::Uncompress::Gunzip));

But as far as I can tell, you can't import qw(gunzip $GunzipError) with Class::Load.

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