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I am trying to build the following layout:

+-----------------------------------+
|                                   |
+-----------------------------------+
+-----------------------------------+
| +-------------------------------+ |
| |                               | |
| +-------------------------------+ |
| +-----+  +-------------+ +------+ |
| |     |  | +---------+ | |      | |
| |     |  | |         | | |      | |
| |     |  | |         | | |      | |
| |     |  | +---------+ | |      | |
| |     |  | +---+ +---+ | |      | |
| |     |  | |   | |   | | |      | |
| |     |  | |   | |   | | |      | |
| |     |  | |   | |   | | |      | |   
| |     |  | +---+ +---+ | |      | |
| +-----+  +-------------+ +------+ |
+-----------------------------------+

but for some reason the divs won't expand to full width or height: http://jsfiddle.net/vmpgf/

any suggestions?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
try using overflow: auto; for the divs that aren't expanding to full height for width you can set width: 100% – Brian Jun 13 '12 at 18:28
    
This design cannot be built in this way using percentage heights. – Tom Jun 13 '12 at 18:33
    
Specifying heights on the web is generally bad practice. Unless you have a very specific reason to do so, consider letting your content determine width. There are several excellent techniques for equal-height columns in CSS, many of which will expand with your content. – Ryan Kinal Jun 13 '12 at 21:21

Well this will get you very close, I am having some issues with the div on the right, and for some reason it only fits if the total div widths in the three add up to 99% so I am sure this is not the "answer" but will get you close.

HTML -

<div id="divbanner">Top Banner</div>
<div id="container">
    <div id="banner">
        Banner
    </div>
    <div id="left">
        Left
    </div>
    <div id="center">
        <div id="centertop">
            Center Top
        </div>
        <div id="centerleft">
            Center Left
        </div>
        <div id="centerright">
            Center Right
        </div>
    </div>
    <div id="right">
        Right
    </div>
</div>

CSS -

#divbanner {
    width: 100%;
    background: #F45;
}
#container {
    width: 100%;
    background: #00C;
}
#banner {
    width: 100%;
    background: #778;
}
#left {
    width: 30%;
    background: #cc5;
    display: inline-block;
}
#center {
    width: 39%;
    background: #cc7;
    display: inline-block;
}
#right {
    width: 30%;
    background: #cc7;
    display: inline-block;
}
#centertop {
    width: 100%;
    background: #445;
}
#centerleft {
    width: 50%;
    background: #c62;
    float: left;
}
#centerright {
    width: 50%;
    background: #062;
    float: right;
}​

​ Try it out here: http://jsfiddle.net/tyDq5/

share|improve this answer
    
if you add a min-height: to each css block then it gets the height piece as well. only seems to be working in chrome though :-( – Brian Jun 13 '12 at 20:15
    
and btw, you're correct that it will only work if the children divs are smaller than the parent div. you can get around this a bit by using z-indexes – Brian Jun 13 '12 at 20:16
    
yea its close but like somebody stated before, this type of layout probably isnt a good idea with percentages, too many variables to go wrong when they open it on an 800x600 screen – Chris James Champeau Jun 14 '12 at 1:41
    
percentages for heights are bad but for widths it is fine and normal practice. min-height is the attribute I don't like in general but sometimes it is the appropriate tool. setting widths as absolute pixel values can get you in a lot of trouble when it comes to screen width. – Brian Jun 14 '12 at 12:37
    
depends on the end result desired, tack stack overflow for example, there are no use of percentages, rather a defined width of the site, and if you screen is smaller, you have a horizontal scrollbar, and if your screen is larger, you have space on the left and right side – Chris James Champeau Jun 15 '12 at 19:28

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