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Is there a way to determine the type of variable passed to a template and call a function based on if it's an int or std::string etc...?

For example

template <class T>
struct Jam
{
     Jam(T *var)
     {
         if (typeid(var) == typeid(std::string*)
                *var = "Hello!";
         else if (typeid(var) == typeid(int*)
                *var = 25;
     }
};

When I try to use that code, i get an error invalid conversion from const char* to int. I suspect this is because the compiler "expands" the template into separate functions and when I specified a new instance of the structure throw Jam<std::string>(&setme); it detected the var* = 25 statement and refused to compile.

Is there a proper way to do this? Maybe with macro guards? Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
@chris Ooops! Typo. –  user99545 Jun 13 '12 at 18:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Use regular function overloading instead:

template <class T>
struct Jam
{
    Jam(std::string* var)
    {
        *var = "Hello!";
    }

    Jam(int* var)
    {
        *var = 25;
    }
};

unless you want to specialize on the type T used to instantiate Jam. In that case you would do:

template<>
struct Jam<std::string>
{
    Jam(std::string* var)
    {
        *var = "Hello!";
    }
};

template<>
struct Jam<int>
{
    Jam(int* var)
    {
        *var = 25;
    }
};


template<typename T>
struct Jam
{
    Jam(T* var)
    {
        // every other type
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
There are other alternatives, as for example specializing only the constructor (template <> Jam<int>::Jam( int* var ) {} outside of the template class definition) or more complex SFINAE to enable/disable code based on the template arguments... I don't think it makes sense in this simple problem, but it might make sense when these simple solutions become a burden (say that the constructor did 100 things, only one of which is dependent on the type, or that there were 100 other member functions and specializing the whole type would be expensive) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 13 '12 at 19:06

Look up "partial template specialization".

Take Jam()'s body out of Jam{}:

template <class T>
struct Jam
{
  Jam(T *var);
};

Now write two bodies:

Jam<int>::Jam(int *var) {
   // stuff
}

Jam<std::string>::Jam(std::string *var) {
   // stuff
}

(Warning: Rusty C++. But that's generally how you do it.)

New question: If you need duck-typing, why are you using C++ at all? I'd switch to Ruby, and save the C++ for plugins that need speed. But C++ will still support elegant designs, with more work!

share|improve this answer
    
+1, although this is not what is commonly referred to as partial template specialization. The partial in partial template specialization usually refers to the fact that the specialization is applied to only a subset of types, as compared to a full specialization for which all the template arguments are fixed. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 13 '12 at 19:08

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