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Can anybody show with some examples the exact difference between .. and ... operator?

From the perlop man page:

If you don't want it to test the right operand until the next evaluation, as in sed, just use three dots ("...") instead of two.

But what exactly this mean? I don't understand the perlop's example:

@lines = ("   - Foo",
          "01 - Bar",
          "1  - Baz",
          "   - Quux"
);
foreach (@lines) {
    if (/0/ .. /1/) {
        print "$_\n";
    }
}

with ... will print the Baz - but why? More precisely, why is Baz not printed with two dots and only with ...?

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3  
This is the kind of Perl feature that can drive you crazy if you have to maintain someone else's code or even your own after some time. Both .. and ... work like flip-flops. The .. can be both set and reset on the same "clock" or evaluation (though it still reports a "true" for its return value in this case). The ... can only be set or reset, not both. –  Gene Jun 13 '12 at 19:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

«...» doesn't do a flop check immediately after a true flip check.

With «..»,

  1. " - Foo"
    1. /0/ returns false.
    2. .. returns false.
  2. "01 - Bar"
    1. /0/ returns true. Flip!
    2. /1/ returns true. Flop!
    3. .. returns true (since the first check was true).
  3. "1 - Baz"
    1. /0/ returns false.
    2. .. returns false.
  4. " - Quux"
    1. /0/ returns false.
    2. .. returns false.

With «...»,

  1. " - Foo"
    1. /0/ returns false.
    2. ... returns false.
  2. "01 - Bar"
    1. /0/ returns true. Flip!
    2. ... returns true.
  3. "1 - Baz"
    1. /1/ returns true. Flop!
    2. ... returns true.
  4. " - Quux"
    1. /0/ returns false.
    2. ... returns false.
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Repeating the example here:

@lines = ("   - Foo",
          "01 - Bar",
          "1  - Baz",
          "   - Quux"
);
foreach (@lines) {
    if (/0/ .. /1/) {
        print "$_\n";
    }
}

It's tricky... what's happening when you use the 2 dots .. is that when you reach "01 - Bar", both conditions are tested and both succeed (because that line has a 0 and also a 1). So your printing is turned on and immediately turned off.

However, when you use ..., the first condition succeeds, but the second one is not tried until the next iteration of the loop, so "01 - Bar" turns it on and "1 - Baz" turns it off. Thus you see both lines printed.

The tricky part is to realize that the "01 - Bar" satisfies both tests.

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so, the .. and ... works like on/off switch. at the start when the left one matches, turn ON the switch and remain turned on until the second (right) matches. And .. testing the second immediately and ... only in the next line - (second iteration).. - i hope, now understand it. –  kobame Jun 13 '12 at 19:45
    
Exactly. It's called a "toggle" or a "flip/flop", it's like an on/off switch. If it's currently off, it tests the left side, and if that succeeds, then it turns it on. If it's currently on, it tests the right side, and if that succeeds, turns it off. The difference between .. and ... is that with .., both tests can happen in the same iteration, but with ... they have to be separate iterations. In both cases, it is as if the "on" test happens at the start of the loop, and the "off" test happens at the end of the loop. –  theglauber Jun 13 '12 at 20:25

If you have cases like /start/ .. /end/ with input

start some text end
start
some other text
end

the .. operator will process the end in the first line as soon as it reads it and will only print some text. The ... operator will not process the end on the first line so the other text will also be printed. Basically you can avoid stopping the range if the ending value is matched on the same line as the start. The ... postpones the check until the next iteration.

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thank you - unfortunately i can accept only one answer. –  kobame Jun 13 '12 at 19:46

Article

There's a great article called Dots and Perl, I recommend you read it.

To summarise:

One Dot

  • Concatenation operator:

    say "one" . "two";
    # Outputs "onetwo"
    

Two dots

  • Range operator:

    my @numbers = (1..100); # has one hundred numbers from 1 to 100
    
  • Flip-flop operator:

    while (my $line = readline($fh)) {
        process_this_line($line) if m/START/ .. m/END/;
    }
    

Three dots

  • Yada-yada statement:

    sub example {
        ...
        # throws "Unimplemented" exception when called
    }
    
  • Flip-flop operator, three-dot version:

    while (my $line = readline($fh)) {
        process_this_line($line) if m/START/ ... m/END/;
        # The only difference between this and the two-dot version
        # occurs when a single line has both START and END
    }
    

The other answers go into more detail on the difference between the two flip-flop operators.

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