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I have a rich AJAX-based web application that uses JQuery + Knockout. I have a JQuery plugin that wraps my Knockout view models to expose utility methods like .reset(), .isDirty(), and so on.

I have a method called .setBaseline() that essentially takes a snapshot of the data model once it has been populated (via the mapping plugin). Then I can use this snapshot to quickly determine if the model has changed.

What I'm looking for is some kind of general purpose function that can return an object that represents the differences between two 2 JavaScript objects where one of the objects is considered to be the master.

For example, assume that this is my snapshot:

var snapShot = {
  name: "Joe",
  address: "123 Main Street",
  age: 30,
  favoriteColorPriority: {
     yellow: 1,
     pink: 2,
     blue: 3
  }
};

Then assume that the live data looks like this:

var liveData = {
    name: "Joseph",
    address: "123 Main Street",
    age: 30,
    favoriteColorPriority: {
        yellow: 1,
        pink: 3,
        blue: 2
    }
};

I want a .getChanges(snapShot, liveData) utility function that returns the following:

var differences = {
    name: "Joseph",
    favoriteColorPriority: {
        pink: 3,
        blue: 2
    }
};

I was hoping that the _.underscore library might have something like this, but I couldn't find anything that seemed to work like this.

share|improve this question
    
I saw this same question asked this morning. –  epascarello Jun 13 '12 at 19:24
    
Brilliant minds think alike! :-) Do you have a link? –  Armchair Bronco Jun 13 '12 at 19:25
1  
@epascarello stackoverflow.com/questions/11016857/… perhaps? –  apsillers Jun 13 '12 at 19:30
    
Thanks. I'm reviewing the suggestions in that Question to see if anything suits my use case. So far, the author of that Question hasn't accepted an answer so I'd like to let this question run a bit longer. –  Armchair Bronco Jun 13 '12 at 19:36
    

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I don't think there is such a function in underscore, but it's easy to implement yourself:

function getChanges(prev, now) {
    var changes = {};
    for (var prop in now) {
        if (!prev || prev[prop] !== now[prop]) {
            if (typeof now[prop] == "object") {
                var c = getChanges(prev[prop], now[prop]);
                if (! _.isEmpty(c) ) // underscore
                    changes[prop] = c;
            } else {
                changes[prop] = now[prop];
            }
        }
    }
    return changes;
}

or

function getChanges(prev, now) {
    var changes = {}, prop, pc;
    for (prop in now) {
        if (!prev || prev[prop] !== now[prop]) {
            if (typeof now[prop] == "object") {
                if(c = getChanges(prev[prop], now[prop]))
                    changes[prop] = c;
            } else {
                changes[prop] = now[prop];
            }
        }
    }
    for (prop in changes)
        return changes;
    return false; // false when unchanged
}

This will not work with Arrays (or any other non-plain-Objects) or differently structured objects (removals, primitive to object type changes).

share|improve this answer
1  
Removed my answer in favor of this. –  Radu Jun 13 '12 at 20:06
    
These these now using real data. One thing I forgot to mention is that if the snapShot contains data missing from the current (live) data, then I don't want to see those values in the changeList. For example, my shapShot data model includes an empty object called 'businessUnitProperties: {}' This might be a key/value pair. If the live data doesn't have this member, then changes shouldn't return it either. –  Armchair Bronco Jun 13 '12 at 20:09
    
One possible issue with this could stem from the use of typeof which is notoriously unreliable. As long as you're aware of the caveats you should be fine though. –  Radu Jun 13 '12 at 20:12
    
For typeof() issues, I'll use the _.underscore wrapper _.isObject(). However, so far so good. –  Armchair Bronco Jun 13 '12 at 20:16
1  
Yes, of course. Could you add one to your example in the question, so that I can see how you would want changes to them? The simple method would be treating them like primitive values, just add && !Array.isArray(now[prop]) after the typeof now[prop] == "object"... –  Bergi Jun 13 '12 at 23:40

Posting my own answer so folks can see the final implementation that also works with arrays. In the code below, "um" is my namespace, and I'm also using the _.isArray() and _.isObject methods from Underscore.js.

The code that looks for "_KO" is used to skip past Knockout.js members that are present in the object.

// This function compares 'now' to 'prev' and returns a new JavaScript object that contains only
// differences between 'now' and 'prev'. If 'prev' contains members that are missing from 'now',
// those members are *not* returned. 'now' is treated as the master list.
um.utils.getChanges = function (prev, now) {
    var changes = {};
    var prop = {};
    var c = {};
    //-----

    for (prop in now) { //ignore jslint
        if (prop.indexOf("_KO") > -1) {
            continue; //ignore jslint
        }

        if (!prev || prev[prop] !== now[prop]) {
            if (_.isArray(now[prop])) {
                changes[prop] = now[prop];
            }
            else if (_.isObject(now[prop])) {
                // Recursion alert
                c = um.utils.getChanges(prev[prop], now[prop]);
                if (!_.isEmpty(c)) {
                    changes[prop] = c;
                }
            } else {
                changes[prop] = now[prop];
            }
        }
    }

    return changes;
};
share|improve this answer

I am using JsonDiffPatch in my projects to find the delta, transfer it over the net, and then patch the object at the other end to get the exact copy. It is very easy to use and works really well.

And it works with arrays too!

share|improve this answer
    
I'll take a look at this library. I've already custom fitted my own solution using the code above as a starting point, so it's probably too late in the game to switch to something new when what I have now isn't broken. But it's great to see some standalone libraries for doing these kinds of comparisons in a generic way. –  Armchair Bronco Feb 7 at 19:58

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