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I'm trying to change a variable of NSString type by calling a method. But it doesn't work. I tried this very same method with othe types and it worked perfectly fine. Can you help me out there?

Interface:

- (void) changeNSString: (NSString *) stringToChange;

Implementation:

- (void) changeNSString: (NSString *) stringToChange{

    stringToChange = @"Test";    
}

- (IBAction)actionBla:(id)sender {

    NSString *myString = [NSString string];
    [self changeNSString:myString];
    NSLog(myString);            //Returns nothing or empty string

}

====================== Edit: thanks to the help of CrimsonDiego, here is a working solution. Though I still have a little understanding issue: why is there no type-error when assigning a NSMutableString to a NSString var?

Interface:

- (void) changeNSMutableString: (NSMutableString *) stringToChange;

Implementation:

- (void) changeNSMutableString: (NSMutableString *) stringToChange{

    [stringToChange setString:@"Test"]    
}

- (IBAction)actionBla:(id)sender {

    NSMutableString *myString = [NSMutableString string];
    [self changeNSMutableString:myString];
    self.myLabel.text = myString;           //Why is there no type error???

}
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You are assigning a new variable to a local variable within the function.

The local variable stringToChange references the same variable as myString at first, but when you assign @"Test" to stringToChange, it no longer references the original string.

The solution here would be to use NSMutableString, or have a class variable (or property) and use that instead of passing it to the function.

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So I guess, the reason why the reference betweend the local variable stringToChange and myString (which is there at first) is destroyed is, that NSString is immutable? –  Hans Jun 13 '12 at 19:31
1  
It isn't because the string is immutable - the same would happen if you just replaced 'NSString' with 'NSMutableString' - what is happening is that stringToChange and myString are two separate variables that initially reference the same object. When you assign @"Test" to the stringToChange variable, you are not editing the old object. You are assigning a new object to the stringToChange variable, without changing the old one. If you wanted to use an NSMutableString, you'd simply say inside the changeNSString function: [stringToChange setString:@"Test"]. –  CrimsonDiego Jun 13 '12 at 19:38
    
Now it makes sense, thank you very very much!!!! –  Hans Jun 13 '12 at 19:43
    
I still have a little understanding issue: why is there no type-error when assigning a NSMutableString to a NSString var? –  Hans Jun 14 '12 at 12:38
    
An NSMutableString is a subclass of NSString, ergo an NSMutableString is an NSString, just a specialized one. –  CrimsonDiego Jun 14 '12 at 14:01
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Your setting stringToChange as local in your function. Try the following:

- (NSString*) changeNSString: (NSString *) stringToChange{

    stringToChange = @"Test";
    return stringToChange;
}

- (IBAction)actionBla:(id)sender {

    NSString *myString = [NSString string];
    myString = [self changeNSString:myString];
    NSLog(myString);            //Returns nothing or empty string

}
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This is actually another excellent method of doing this. Upvoted. –  CrimsonDiego Jun 13 '12 at 19:32
    
Sorta -- it doesn't actually change any of the strings. It changes the references. While this works, it is a bit inefecient. –  bbum Jun 13 '12 at 20:00
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I am no expert on Objective-C but it seems to me that stringToChange, as in "normal" C, is a parameter that can contain a pointer to a string. The parameter is pass-by-value and thus, when you assign @"Test" to stringToChange you are actually only changing the local parameter stringToChange and not myString. If you want to change myString you have to change the parameter type to NSString ** and pass &myString as a parameter instead.

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1  
This is technically absolutely correct, but it should be noted that as a matter of convention the pointer-to-pointer technique should only be used in very specific circumstances in Cocoa, and this isn't one of them. –  Josh Caswell Jun 13 '12 at 19:30
    
I think that's not true, since all objects in Objective C are pointers. –  Hans Jun 13 '12 at 19:33
1  
That is why he said it was technically absolutely correct. It would work, true, but Cocoa conventions state that you should avoid behavior like this. –  CrimsonDiego Jun 13 '12 at 19:36
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