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I have some Scala code that uses existential types that I'm upgrading to 2.10, and I noticed a warning about adding "import language.existentials" which makes me think there should be a better way to write this. The code I have boils down to:

class A {
  private var values = Set.empty[(Class[_], String)]
  def add(klass: Class[_], id: String) {
    val key = (klass, id)
    if (!values(key)) {
      values += key
      // More logic below..
    }
  }

I get this warning:

[warn] test.scala:4 inferred existential type (Class[_$2], String) forSome { type _$2 }, which cannot be expressed by wildcards, should be enabled
[warn] by making the implicit value language.existentials visible.
[warn] This can be achieved by adding the import clause 'import language.existentials'
[warn] or by setting the compiler option -language:existentials.
[warn] See the Scala docs for value scala.language.existentials for a discussion
[warn] why the feature should be explicitly enabled.
[warn]       val key = (klass, id)

Is there a way I can rewrite my code not generate this warning (or require the import), or is that the most idiomatic way to express it? I never ask about the type parameter of Class anywhere in the code.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The warning is about the inference of existential type, which is usually undesirable. Either add the import statement, or make it explicit:

val key: (Class[_], String) = (klass, id)
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sorry, I don't get the point. Why is the inferred type dangerous or undesirable? The parameter on Class doesn't matter, it almost never does when you have to deal with classes and reflection (since it is erased and thus worthless at the point when you're forced to inspect or use the class info). Why shall we be forced to write an superfluous type declaration for something as clear and simple as the key in this case. There is a type declaration one line above, so where is the problem? –  Ichthyo Jan 18 at 14:00
    
let me clarify: I am aware that you can build very complicated and confusing stuff with the full syntax for existential types. But in this case here, where is the problem or danger? Class[_] seems adequate –  Ichthyo Jan 18 at 14:13
    
@Ichthyo that might be true of Class, but an existential List is not nearly as useful, for example. The type parameter on Class is mostly useless, which is why existential with it is not a big deal. –  Daniel C. Sobral Jan 20 at 20:08

If you provide a type parameter for the add method the warning goes away. This doesn't affect what can be stored in the var values. I haven't a good answer as to why but it's a workaround. Hopefully someone more able will also respond with an explanation.

  class A {
    private var values = Set.empty[(Class[_], String)]

    def add[T](klass: Class[T], id: String) {
      val key = (klass, id)
      if (!values(key)) {
        values += key
        // More logic below..
      }
    }
  }
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