Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to write a class with three int values in them and manipulate them in main();

There are two ways I can think of doing this

  1. Have a seperate .class file and include it into another class file containint the main() function

stuff.java:

class stuff { ... }

class app {

public static void main(String[] arguments) {
   .. // manipulate the instance variables
     }
}

2 have the class and then a class containint the main function in the same file app.java

app.java:

class stuff { ... }

class app {

public static void main(String[] arguments) {
   .. // manipulate the instance variables
     }
}

Are these the main ways it is done in java ( I didn't see anything on including java classes ). Or can I make the stuff class contain main itself?

share|improve this question
    
What do you mean by "class with three int values"? Do you really mean class variables, i.e. fields, or any three variables will suffice? –  maksimov Jun 13 '12 at 21:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I am wondering, if you want to write a class with three int values in them and manipulate them in main() method just do it! Why do you need some staff class ?

share|improve this answer
    
Just to see how it would be done in Java. I wanted to explore all possibilities in case i needed to use it that way. –  Chris Okyen Jun 13 '12 at 21:31

You do not need to have two separate classes. You can simply place the main main in the same class that contains the instance variables.

class App {

   int var1;
   int var2;
   int var3;

   public static void main(String[] arguments) {
       .. // manipulate the instance variables
      App app = new App();
      app.var1 = 1;
      app.var2 = 2;
      app.var3 = 3;
   }
}

Edit: Bassed on your comment, you want to use have to objects to do this. If the classes are in the same package it is pretty simple.

Stuff.java

public class Stuff {
   int var1;
   int var2;
   int var3;
}

App.java

class App {

   public static void main(String[] arguments) {
       .. // manipulate the instance variables
      Stuff stuff = new Stuff();
      stuff.var1 = 1;
      stuff.var2 = 2;
      stuff.var3 = 3;
   }
}

This obviously an overly simplistic example, but should give you the general idea. If the App class is in a different pacakge you simply need to import the Stuff class by adding import pacakage.name.Stuff; at the top of the App class.

share|improve this answer
    
Glad I could help and welcome to Stack Overflow. Just a heads up, if my answer solved your problem, you can mark it as accepted by clicking on the check mark to left of my answer. You can also read over some of the other oddities and what not of how SO works here. –  jschoen Jun 14 '12 at 0:24
  1. The classes are usually defined in .java files. When they are compiled, compiler will create a separate .class file for every class you defined. You can put multiple classes in single .java file; however, classes marked as public will require separate .java file.
  2. You might consider inner class for your purposes
share|improve this answer
    
Having the main class inside another class is kinda unnatural, since main uses stuff, and having stuff contain main implies the opposite. –  dario_ramos Jun 13 '12 at 20:59
    
@dario_ramos However, it is possible to have stuff class inside app class. –  artdanil Jun 13 '12 at 21:02
    
@dario_ramos that is what i was thinking. –  Chris Okyen Jun 13 '12 at 21:02
    
Yes, that would be a better design IMHO –  dario_ramos Jun 13 '12 at 21:03
    
I dont know how to include a seperate .class file containing stuf which would be included by another .class file app to make an instance of the stuff class... I would please like to know how to do this although thanks @jschoen. –  Chris Okyen Jun 13 '12 at 21:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.