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This question is from a great youtube channel, giving problems that can be asked in interviews.

It's basically related to finding the balance point in an array. Here is an example to best explain it; {1,2,9,4,-1}. In here since sum(1+2)=sum(4+(-1)) making the 9 the balance point. Without checking the answer I've decided to implement the algorithm before wanted to ask whether a more efficient approach could be done;

  1. Sum all the elements in array O(n)
  2. Get the half of the sum O(1)
  3. Start scanning the array, from left, and stop when the sumleft is bigger than half of the general sum. O(n)
  4. Do the same for the right, to obtain sum right. O(n).
  5. If sumleft is equal to sumright return arr[size/2] else return -1

I'm asking because this solution popped into my head without any effort, providing the O(n) running time. Is this solution, if true, could be developed or if not true any alternative methods?

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What if there's no balance point, like {1, 2, 3, 4, 5}? –  jrok Jun 13 '12 at 21:00
    
Thank you James! –  Ali Jun 13 '12 at 21:00
    
@jrok thanks for the heads up! I've edited the question –  Ali Jun 13 '12 at 21:01
    
@jrok I think the balance point of that array is the 4. IE the sum of the elements to the left is 6 the sum of the elements to the right is 5. The distance we want to minimize is only 1. The trick is in the fact that the array can contain negative numbers. –  Paulpro Jun 13 '12 at 21:15
    
@jrok - your example DOES have a balance point, it just isnt an integer placement within the set. It is balanced at some point between the 4 and 5. –  trumpetlicks Jun 13 '12 at 21:40

4 Answers 4

Your algorithm is not good (counter-example: 1 -1 1 0 1 -1 1), the good solution is to compute partial sum of your array (so that you can can compute sumleft and sumright in O(1) for each cell of the array) and then (or in the same time if you already know the global sum) search in your array a cell such that sumleft = sumright which is O(n).

The partial sum of the array A is

[A[0], A[0]+A[1], A[0]+A[1]+A[2], …, A[0]+A[1]+A[2]+…+A[n-1]]

example:

A=[5,2,3,1,4,6]
partial sum = [5,7,10,11,15,21]

With this array you can compute sumleft[i]=partial_sum[i-1] and sumright[i]=partial_sum[n-1]-partial_sum[i]

Improvement:

Computing the global sum first and then only the partial sum for the current index enable you to use only O(1) extra space instead of O(n) extra space if you store all the partial_sum array.

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Thanks for the counter-example! Was really looking forward to it. Can you explain this method in detail. I could not follow what you meant by partial sum –  Ali Jun 13 '12 at 21:02
    
I have updated my answer –  Thomash Jun 13 '12 at 21:08
    
I was examining your example and noticed that does this example have a balance point? –  Ali Jun 13 '12 at 21:11
    
indeed, there was a mistake. –  Thomash Jun 13 '12 at 21:15
    
You might wanna define sumleft[i] = sum[i-1] and sumright[i] = sum[n-1] - sum[i]. That would give a complete solution. –  Samy Arous Jun 13 '12 at 21:37

I would actually have 2 start points, one on the leftmost point (leftLoc), and one at the right most point (rightLoc). Hold a sumLeft and sumRight numbers.

leftLoc  = 0;
rightLoc = (n - 1);
sumRight = array[rightLoc];
sumLeft  = array[leftLoc];

while(leftLoc < rightLoc){
    if(sumRight > sumLeft){
        leftLoc++;
        sumLeft += array[leftLoc];
    }else{
        rightLoc--;
        sumRight += array[rightLoc];
    } 
}

if( (sumRight + array[rightLoc - 1]) == sumLeft ){
    return rightLoc--;
}else if( (sumLeft + array[leftLoc + 1]) == sumRight){
    return leftLoc++;
}else{
    // return floating point number location in the middle of the 2 locations
}

All the while keeping track of how many total positions have been moved O(n)

You may find that your balance point is a floating point number in the middle of the final points (once they are at the integer locations right next to one another).

This should even work with the negative numbers example. Perhaps I am missing some fine grain details, but some variation on this theme should result you in an O(n) runtime algorithm.

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I guess you do this procedure in a loop like 'while(leftmost<rightmost)' right? –  Ali Jun 13 '12 at 21:08
    
Yeah, something like that!!! –  trumpetlicks Jun 13 '12 at 21:09
1  
sorry, I wanted to write 1 -1 1 0 1 -1 1. –  Thomash Jun 13 '12 at 21:16
3  
First, I don't get what you mean by TRUE O(n). If you do it in two linear passes, it's still O(n), end of discussion. Second, your algorithm implicitly assumes that all numbers are positive, which is not true. For instance -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 5 –  ffao Jun 14 '12 at 0:38
1  
I don't think you understand the problem properly. The correct balance point for that case would be the second -1, quite far away from the 5. –  ffao Jun 14 '12 at 1:54

Basically add up all the numbers first. This will be an O(n) operation. Then substract one element from the array at a time starting from the beginning of the array till upper == lower. Thus the total order will be O(n).

int BalancePoint(int a[], int begin, int end) // find index of an array (balance point) such that sum of all elements before the index = sum of all elements after it; else return -1
{
    if(!a) return -1;
    else if(begin == end) return begin;

        long long upper = 0;
        long long lower = 0;

    for(int i = begin; i <= end; ++i)
    {
        upper += *(a+i);
    }

    for(int j = begin; j <= end; ++j)
    {
        upper -= *(a+j);
        if(upper == lower) return j;
        lower += *(a+j);
    }
    return -1;
}

Using STL

int BalancePointSTL( const vector<int> &A ) // find index of an array (balance point) such that sum of all elements before the index = sum of all elements after it; else return -1
{
    if(A.empty()) return -1;

        long long upper = 0;
        long long lower = 0;

    for(unsigned int i = 0; i <= A.size(); ++i)
    {
        upper += A[i];
    }

    for(unsigned int j = 0; j < A.size(); ++j)
    {
        upper -= A[j];
        if(upper == lower) return j;
        lower += A[j];
    }
    return -1;
    }

The following would have a better worst case performance but a couple more if-else comparisons

int BalancePoint2(int a[], int begin, int end) // Better worst case senario by factor of 2
{
    if(!a) return -1;
    else if(begin == end) return begin;

        long long upper = 0;
        long long lower = 0;

        int mid = (end-begin)/2;

        for(int i = begin; i < mid; ++i)
        {
            lower += *(a+i);
        }
        for(int i = mid+1; i <= end; ++i)
        {
            upper += *(a+i);
        } 

        if(upper == lower) return mid;
        else if(lower < upper)
        {
            lower += *(a+mid);
            for(int i= mid + 1 ; i <= end ; ++i)
            {
                upper -= *(a + i);
                if(upper == lower) return i;
                lower += *(a + i);
            }
        }
        else {
            upper += *(a + mid);
            for(int i = mid - 1; i >=begin; --i)
            {
                lower -= *(a + i);
                if(upper == lower) return i;
                upper += *(a + i);
            }
        }
        return -1;
}
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Thanks for the effort but I'm not really looking for a code. But thanks again –  Ali Jun 13 '12 at 21:16
    
I found the best approach to be adding all the numbers first and assigning teh value to a variable called say upper. Then set the balance point as the first variable from the input array while substracting its value from upper. Set another variable lower to 0. This is your starting point. Then move the balance point along the array one element at a time while adding that element to lower and substracting it from upper. Do this till upper == lower. If you come to the end of the array without meeting that balance condition, return saying balance point does not exist. –  Chinmay Nerurkar Jun 13 '12 at 21:29
    
This is the SLOW way of doing it!!! You dont need a full sum first. Indeed these are good coding samples, but not the fastest implementations. He was looking for BETTER, not the SAME. You have implemented the same as what his question essentially states –  trumpetlicks Jun 13 '12 at 21:34
    
This is slower but worked for all cases including when negative numbers can cause the lower sum to be higher than the upper sum before reaching balance point. Like in Thomash's example {1 -1 1 0 1 -1 1}. Also my scheme will find only the first balance point in an input array like {1 -1 1 0 0 0 1 -1 1}. –  Chinmay Nerurkar Jun 13 '12 at 21:51
    
std::accumulate would take a few lines out. –  chris Jun 13 '12 at 22:13

I believe you are looking for the Center of Mass, here is a solution written in Go:

func centerOfGravity(a []int) float64 {
  tot := 0.0
  mass := 0.0
  for i := range a {
    tot += float64(i) * float64(a[i])
    mass += float64(a[i])
  }
  return tot / mass
}

This gives you the index of the center of mass in the array, assuming a 0-based array. It can return a non-integer result since the center of mass can be anywhere in the range of the array.

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This is TOTALLY useless, center of mass doesn't care about order, this answer needs to care about the order. How does center of mass return indexed position in this case? –  trumpetlicks Jun 14 '12 at 0:46

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