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How can I programmatically detect that a deadlock has occurred in a Java program?

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You should specify whether you need to detect this programmatically or via some kind of external monitoring tool? –  oxbow_lakes Jul 9 '09 at 7:49
    
detecting programmatically.. –  Raji Jul 9 '09 at 8:32
    
The JavaSpecialist website (always worth reading) has an interesting article on this, discussing the theory and practice. –  Brian Agnew Jul 9 '09 at 9:20
    
Ah, my answer was assuming using a tool. I guess it is useful to know about both approaches anyway. –  RichardOD Jul 9 '09 at 11:17
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8 Answers 8

You can do this programmatically using the ThreadMXBean that ships with the JDK:

ThreadMXBean bean = ManagementFactory.getThreadMXBean();
long[] threadIds = bean.findDeadlockedThreads(); // Returns null if no threads are deadlocked.

if (threadIds != null) {
    ThreadInfo[] infos = bean.getThreadInfo(threadIds);

    for (ThreadInfo info : infos) {
        StackTraceElement[] stack = info.getStackTrace();
        // Log or store stack trace information.
    }
}

Obviously you should try to isolate whichever thread is performing this deadlock check - Otherwise if that thread deadlocks it won't be able to run the check!

Incidentally this is what JConsole is using under the covers.

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The Javadoc for that method says it might be expensive. Do you happen to know about how expensive? –  Bart van Heukelom May 4 '11 at 10:46
    
No I don't although I guess you could write some code to time the operation and see how this scales as thread count / number of locks increases. –  Adamski Jul 21 at 20:49
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One useful hint for investigation:

If you can catch the application red handed and suspect a deadlock has occurred, go and press "Ctrl-Break" in the java.exe console window (or "Ctrl-\" on Solaris/Linux). The jvm will dump the current status and stack trace of all threads, find out dead locks and precisely describe them.

It will look something like this:

Full thread dump Java HotSpot(TM) Client VM (1.5.0_09-b03 mixed mode):

"[Test Timer] Request Queue" prio=6 tid=0x13d708d0 nid=0x1ec in Object.
    wait() [0x1b00f000..0x1b00fb68]
    at java.lang.Object.wait(Native Method)
    at java.lang.Object.wait(Unknown Source)
    at library.util.AsyncQueue.run(AsyncQueue.java:138)
        - locked <0x02e70000> (a test.server.scheduler.SchedulerRequestQueue)

    ...

Found one Java-level deadlock:
=============================
"Corba service":
  waiting to lock monitor 0x13c06684 (object 0x04697d90, a java.lang.Object),
  which is held by "[Server Connection] Heartbeat Timer"
"[Server Connection] Heartbeat Timer":
  waiting to lock monitor 0x13c065c4 (object 0x0467e728, a test.proxy.ServerProxy), which is held by "Corba service"

Java stack information for the threads listed above:
===================================================
"Corba service":
    at test.proxy.ServerProxy.stopHBWatchDog(ServerProxy:695)
    - waiting to lock <0x04697d90> (a java.lang.Object)
    ...
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Or ctrl-\ from Solaris/Linux. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jul 9 '09 at 11:48
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Actually what you want is send a "QUIT" signal (ie a SIGQUIT) but it's not really a 'QUIT'. A SIGQUIT on OS X, Linux (and Solaris) on a Java app dumps the stacktrace. Ctrl+\ is one way to send a SIGQUIT. Taking the pid and doing: kill -3 {id} is another way to do it. –  SyntaxT3rr0r Mar 15 '10 at 14:29
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You might want to consider IBM's MTRAT. Prevention is better than cure after all. The Multicore Software Development Kit also comes with a deadlock detection tool.

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If you don't require programmatic detection you can do this via the JConsole; on the thread tab there is a "detect deadlock" button. In JDK6 this detect locks for both intrinsic monitors and j.u.c Locks

Run up the JConsole via the $JAVA_HOM/bin/jconsole command

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There is code here: http://www.java2s.com/Code/Java/Development-Class/PerformingdeadlockdetectionprogrammaticallywithintheapplicationusingthejavalangmanagementAPI.htm

The magic happens in ThreadMonitor.findDeadlock():

  public boolean findDeadlock() {
    long[] tids;
    if (findDeadlocksMethodName.equals("findDeadlockedThreads")
        && tmbean.isSynchronizerUsageSupported()) {
      tids = tmbean.findDeadlockedThreads();
      if (tids == null) {
        return false;
      }

      System.out.println("Deadlock found :-");
      ThreadInfo[] infos = tmbean.getThreadInfo(tids, true, true);
      for (ThreadInfo ti : infos) {
        printThreadInfo(ti);
        printLockInfo(ti.getLockedSynchronizers());
        System.out.println();
      }
    } else {
      tids = tmbean.findMonitorDeadlockedThreads();
      if (tids == null) {
        return false;
      }
      ThreadInfo[] infos = tmbean.getThreadInfo(tids, Integer.MAX_VALUE);
      for (ThreadInfo ti : infos) {
        // print thread information
        printThreadInfo(ti);
      }
    }

    return true;
  }

This calls an API of the ThreadMXBean which has a different name in Java 5 and 6 (hence the outer if()).

The code example also allows to interrupt the locks, so you can even break the deadlock.

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tempus-fugit also implements it along with a programmatic thread dumping class. It's implemented using the mbean mechanism mentioned above and offers a drop in, out-of-the-box super duper solution.

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JArmus is a library for deadlock detection and avoidance. It includes support for: Thread.join, CyclicBarrier, CountDownLatch, Phaser, and ReentrantLock.

To use JArmus you need to instrument your code. Either through one of its instrumented classes or automatically with the JArmus instrumentar jarmusc.

java -jar jarmusc.jar yourprogram.jar checkedprogram.jar

The input yourprogram.jar is the program you want to check. The output is the same program with checks to automatically find any deadlock.

Barriers need some help

Verifying deadlocks with classes CyclicBarrier, CountDownLatch, Phaser is a bit tricky --- for example, JConsole cannot detect these types of deadlocks. JArmus needs a little help from you: you must specify which threads are influencing synchronization, we call these registered threads.

As soon as possible, the thread must mark itself as registered. A good place to mark registered threads is at the beginning method Runnable.run. JArmus.register(latch);

Example

The following program that deadlocks is correctly identified by JArmus:

final CountDownLatch latch = new CountDownLatch(2);
final CyclicBarrier barrier = new CyclicBarrier(2);
final Queue<Exception> exceptions = new ArrayDeque<>();
Thread t1 = new Thread(new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        try {
            JArmus.register(barrier); // do not forget to register!
            JArmus.register(latch); // do not forget to register!
            latch.countDown();
            latch.await();
            barrier.await();
        } catch (Exception e) {
            exceptions.add(e);
        }
    }
});
Thread t2 = new Thread(new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        try {
            JArmus.register(barrier); // do not forget to register!
            JArmus.register(latch); // do not forget to register!
            barrier.await();
            latch.countDown();
            latch.await();
        } catch (Exception e) {
            exceptions.add(e);
        }
    }
});
t1.start();
t2.start();
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In case you want it to be done in run-time you can use watchdog for that.

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