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How can I programmatically detect that a deadlock has occurred in a Java program?

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You should specify whether you need to detect this programmatically or via some kind of external monitoring tool? –  oxbow_lakes Jul 9 '09 at 7:49
    
detecting programmatically.. –  Raji Jul 9 '09 at 8:32
    
The JavaSpecialist website (always worth reading) has an interesting article on this, discussing the theory and practice. –  Brian Agnew Jul 9 '09 at 9:20
    
Ah, my answer was assuming using a tool. I guess it is useful to know about both approaches anyway. –  RichardOD Jul 9 '09 at 11:17
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7 Answers

You can do this programmatically using the ThreadMXBean that ships with the JDK:

ThreadMXBean bean = ManagementFactory.getThreadMXBean();
long[] threadIds = bean.findDeadlockedThreads(); // Returns null if no threads are deadlocked.

if (threadIds != null) {
    ThreadInfo[] infos = bean.getThreadInfo(threadIds);

    for (ThreadInfo info : infos) {
        StackTraceElement[] stack = info.getStackTrace();
        // Log or store stack trace information.
    }
}

Obviously you should try to isolate whichever thread is performing this deadlock check - Otherwise if that thread deadlocks it won't be able to run the check!

Incidentally this is what JConsole is using under the covers.

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The Javadoc for that method says it might be expensive. Do you happen to know about how expensive? –  Bart van Heukelom May 4 '11 at 10:46
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One useful hint for investigation:

If you can catch the application red handed and suspect a deadlock has occurred, go and press "Ctrl-Break" in the java.exe console window (or "Ctrl-\" on Solaris/Linux). The jvm will dump the current status and stack trace of all threads, find out dead locks and precisely describe them.

It will look something like this:

Full thread dump Java HotSpot(TM) Client VM (1.5.0_09-b03 mixed mode):

"[Test Timer] Request Queue" prio=6 tid=0x13d708d0 nid=0x1ec in Object.
    wait() [0x1b00f000..0x1b00fb68]
    at java.lang.Object.wait(Native Method)
    at java.lang.Object.wait(Unknown Source)
    at library.util.AsyncQueue.run(AsyncQueue.java:138)
        - locked <0x02e70000> (a test.server.scheduler.SchedulerRequestQueue)

    ...

Found one Java-level deadlock:
=============================
"Corba service":
  waiting to lock monitor 0x13c06684 (object 0x04697d90, a java.lang.Object),
  which is held by "[Server Connection] Heartbeat Timer"
"[Server Connection] Heartbeat Timer":
  waiting to lock monitor 0x13c065c4 (object 0x0467e728, a test.proxy.ServerProxy), which is held by "Corba service"

Java stack information for the threads listed above:
===================================================
"Corba service":
    at test.proxy.ServerProxy.stopHBWatchDog(ServerProxy:695)
    - waiting to lock <0x04697d90> (a java.lang.Object)
    ...
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Or ctrl-\ from Solaris/Linux. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jul 9 '09 at 11:48
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Actually what you want is send a "QUIT" signal (ie a SIGQUIT) but it's not really a 'QUIT'. A SIGQUIT on OS X, Linux (and Solaris) on a Java app dumps the stacktrace. Ctrl+\ is one way to send a SIGQUIT. Taking the pid and doing: kill -3 {id} is another way to do it. –  SyntaxT3rr0r Mar 15 '10 at 14:29
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You might want to consider IBM's MTRAT. Prevention is better than cure after all. The Multicore Software Development Kit also comes with a deadlock detection tool.

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If you don't require programmatic detection you can do this via the JConsole; on the thread tab there is a "detect deadlock" button. In JDK6 this detect locks for both intrinsic monitors and j.u.c Locks

Run up the JConsole via the $JAVA_HOM/bin/jconsole command

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There is code here: http://www.java2s.com/Code/Java/Development-Class/PerformingdeadlockdetectionprogrammaticallywithintheapplicationusingthejavalangmanagementAPI.htm

The magic happens in ThreadMonitor.findDeadlock():

  public boolean findDeadlock() {
    long[] tids;
    if (findDeadlocksMethodName.equals("findDeadlockedThreads")
        && tmbean.isSynchronizerUsageSupported()) {
      tids = tmbean.findDeadlockedThreads();
      if (tids == null) {
        return false;
      }

      System.out.println("Deadlock found :-");
      ThreadInfo[] infos = tmbean.getThreadInfo(tids, true, true);
      for (ThreadInfo ti : infos) {
        printThreadInfo(ti);
        printLockInfo(ti.getLockedSynchronizers());
        System.out.println();
      }
    } else {
      tids = tmbean.findMonitorDeadlockedThreads();
      if (tids == null) {
        return false;
      }
      ThreadInfo[] infos = tmbean.getThreadInfo(tids, Integer.MAX_VALUE);
      for (ThreadInfo ti : infos) {
        // print thread information
        printThreadInfo(ti);
      }
    }

    return true;
  }

This calls an API of the ThreadMXBean which has a different name in Java 5 and 6 (hence the outer if()).

The code example also allows to interrupt the locks, so you can even break the deadlock.

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tempus-fugit also implements it along with a programmatic thread dumping class. It's implemented using the mbean mechanism mentioned above and offers a drop in, out-of-the-box super duper solution.

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In case you want it to be done in run-time you can use watchdog for that.

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