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I have an abstract class, Vector, which I would like to overload the operators +,-,*, etc.
I want any derived classes to be able to use these, and get an object back with the same type as the calling object.
I tried with generics, (as follows, in brief), but I couldn't find a legal way to do it:

public static T operator +<T>( T V1, T V2) where T : Vector
{
     //some calculation
     return new T(args);
}

I then tried to do it just using the base class:

    public static Vector operator+(Vector V1, Vector V2)
    {
        if (V1.Dimension != V2.Dimension)
            throw new VectorTypeException("Vector Dimensions Must Be Equal");
        double[] ArgList = new double[V1.Dimension];
        for (int i = 0; i < V1.Dimension; i++) { ArgList[i] = V1[i] + V2[i]; }

        return (Vector)Activator.CreateInstance(V1.GetType(), new object[] { ArgList});
    }

If this method is passed in two child objects, it should perform the operation on them, and return a new object of the same heritage.

The problem I ran into with this is that I cannot enforce that all such child classes must have a constructor with the appropriate signature, and I can't call the base constructor to make the object.

What are ways to either (a) Make either of these work, or (b) do this elegantly in another way?

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How does your derived classes look like? –  JotaBe Jun 13 '12 at 22:49
    
What would the result of VectorA + VectorB be, assuming both derive from Vector? –  Austin Salonen Jun 13 '12 at 22:50
    
It seems odd to me that you would need to subclass Vector (which appears to primarily be an array of double.) Could you explain a little more about your hierarchy? –  dlev Jun 13 '12 at 22:50
1  
Can you implement something like protected abstract Vector Add(Vector otherVector) methods? This way your operators can call the virtual method on one and allow your child implementations to handle the work? –  Chris Sinclair Jun 13 '12 at 22:50
1  
Side note: doing reflection in + operator will lead to very non-intuitive performance of code. Consider other approaches or very cleaver caching of reflection to avoid surprising performance hits. –  Alexei Levenkov Jun 13 '12 at 23:06

2 Answers 2

You could declare instance-level abstract methods which your subclass can override:

public abstract class Vector
{
    protected abstract Vector Add(Vector otherVector);

    public static Vector operator +(Vector v1, Vector v2)
    {
        return v1.Add(v2);
    }
}

public class SubVector : Vector
{
    protected override Vector Add(Vector otherVector)
    {
        //do some SubVector addition
    }
}

Might run into some issues especially with multiple subclasses (Will SubVector have to know how to add with SomeOtherSubVectorClass? What if you add ThirdVectorType class?) and perhaps handling null cases. Also, making sure that SubVector.Add behaves the same as SomeOtherSubVectorClass.Add when it comes to commutative operations.

EDIT: based on your other comments, you could so something like:

public class Vector2D : Vector
{
    public double X { get; set; }
    public double Y { get; set; }

    protected override Vector Add(Vector otherVector)
    {
        Vector2D otherVector2D = otherVector as Vector2D;
        if (otherVector2D != null)
            return new Vector2D() { X = this.X + otherVector2D.X, Y = this.Y + otherVector2D.Y };

        Vector3D otherVector3D = otherVector as Vector3D;
        if (otherVector3D != null)
            return new Vector3D() { X = this.X + otherVector3D.X, Y = this.Y + otherVector3D.Y, Z = otherVector3D.Z };

        //handle other cases
    }
}


public class Vector3D : Vector
{
    public double X { get; set; }
    public double Y { get; set; }
    public double Z { get; set; }

    protected override Vector Add(Vector otherVector)
    {
        Vector2D otherVector2D = otherVector as Vector2D;
        if (otherVector2D != null)
            return new Vector3D() { X = this.X + otherVector2D.X, Y = this.Y + otherVector2D.Y, Z = this.Z };

        Vector3D otherVector3D = otherVector as Vector3D;
        if (otherVector3D != null)
            return new Vector3D() { X = this.X + otherVector3D.X, Y = this.Y + otherVector3D.Y, Z = this.Z + otherVector3D.Z };

        //handle other cases
    }
}

EDITx2:

Given your latest comment, perhaps your should just maintain an internal array/matrix and just do generic matrix math. Your subclasses can expose X/Y/Z property wrappers against the array indicies:

public class Vector
{
    protected double[] Values;
    public int Length { get { return Values.Length; } }

    public static Vector operator +(Vector v1, Vector v2)
    {
        if (v1.Length != v2.Length)
        {
            throw new VectorTypeException("Vector Dimensions Must Be Equal");
        }
        else
        {
            //perform generic matrix addition/operation
            double[] newValues = new double[v1.Length];
            for (int i = 0; i < v1.Length; i++)
            {
                newValues[i] = v1.Values[i] + v2.Values[i];
            }

            //or use some factory/service to give you a Vector2D, Vector3D, or VectorND
            return new Vector() { Values = newValues };
        }
    }
}

public class Vector2D : Vector
{
    public double X
    {
        get { return Values[0]; }
        set { Values[0] = value; }
    }
    public double Y
    {
        get { return Values[1]; }
        set { Values[1] = value; }
    }
}


public class Vector3D : Vector
{
    public double X
    {
        get { return Values[0]; }
        set { Values[0] = value; }
    }
    public double Y
    {
        get { return Values[1]; }
        set { Values[1] = value; }
    }
    public double Z
    {
        get { return Values[2]; }
        set { Values[2] = value; }
    }
}

EDITx3: Based on your latest comment, I guess you could implement operator overloads on each subclass, do the shared logic in a static method (say in the base Vector class), and somewhere do a switch/case check to provide a specific subclass:

    private static Vector Add(Vector v1, Vector v2)
    {
        if (v1.Length != v2.Length)
        {
            throw new VectorTypeException("Vector Dimensions Must Be Equal");
        }
        else
        {
            //perform generic matrix addition/operation
            double[] newValues = new double[v1.Length];
            for (int i = 0; i < v1.Length; i++)
            {
                newValues[i] = v1.Values[i] + v2.Values[i];
            }

            //or use some factory/service to give you a Vector2D, Vector3D, or VectorND
            switch (newValues.Length)
            {
                case 1 :
                    return new Vector1D() { Values = newValues };
                case 2 :
                    return new Vector2D() { Values = newValues };
                case 3 :
                    return new Vector3D() { Values = newValues };
                case 4 :
                    return new Vector4D() { Values = newValues };
                //... and so on
                default :
                    throw new DimensionOutOfRangeException("Do not support vectors greater than 10 dimensions");
                    //or you could just return the generic Vector which doesn't expose X,Y,Z values?
            }
        }
    }

Then your subclasses would have:

    public class Vector2D
    {
        public static Vector2D operator +(Vector2D v1, Vector2D v2)
        {
            return (Vector2D)Add(v1, v2);
        }
    }

    public class Vector3D
    {
        public static Vector3D operator +(Vector3D v1, Vector3D v2)
        {
            return (Vector3D)Add(v1, v2);
        }
    }

Some duplication, but I don't see a way around it off the top of my head to allow the compiler to do this:

    Vector3 v1 = new Vector3(2, 2, 2);
    Vector3 v2 = new Vector3(1, 1, 1);
    var v3 = v1 + v2; //Vector3(3, 3, 3);
    Console.WriteLine(v3.X + ", " + v3.Y + ", " + v3.Z);

or for other dimensions:

    Vector2 v1 = new Vector2(2, 2);
    Vector2 v2 = new Vector2(1, 1);
    var v3 = v1 + v2; //Vector2(3, 3, 3);
    Console.WriteLine(v3.X + ", " + v3.Y); // no "Z" property to output!
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In the case I am using, Vectors can only sum with each other if they are the same length. I am essentially trying for proper vector behaviour. But because all dimension vectors add in the same way, just with a different number of arguments, I want to only write it once. –  3Pi Jun 13 '12 at 22:58
    
Ahh, I edited after this comment. Perhaps then you should treat your vectors with indexed arrays? Do some length checks and perform the matrix math as needed in a generic way? –  Chris Sinclair Jun 13 '12 at 23:01
    
That is essentially what I have already, and posted. Where I am getting confused is the bit where the casting/new object creation occurs. If the return object is created as a child class, but passed out as a parent class, can it be returned to the child class? –  3Pi Jun 13 '12 at 23:12
    
See my last edit above. Some code duplicationish, and an odd switch/case in the base class. Could maybe move that switch/case to a dedicated factory. Anyhow, not sure what else to do beyond that to maintain implicit typing to consumers of your vectors. –  Chris Sinclair Jun 13 '12 at 23:25

What about having an abstract method called Add() that operator+ just acts as a wrapper for? ie, "return v1.Add(v2)". This would also enable you to define interfaces which non-Vector classes can constrain their code to, enabling to perform math-like operations (since generic code can't see/touch operators like +, -, etc for any type).

The only constructor you can code with in a generic method is the default (ie, parameter-less) constructor, which you have to specify in the generic constraints for the method/type.

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