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It seems there is no equivalent of Python App Engine's _ah/admin for the Java implementation of Google App Engine.

Is there a manual way I can browse the datastore? Where are the files to be found on my machine? (I am using the App Engine plugin with Eclipse on OS X).

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6 Answers 6

http://googleappengine.blogspot.com/2009/07/google-app-engine-for-java-sdk-122.html: "At long last, the dev appserver has a data viewer. Start your app locally and point your browser to http://localhost:8888/_ah/admin http://localhost:8000/datastore* to check it out."

* as of 1.7.7

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New admin interface is still not working with kinds/entities created by Native Datastore API. So I still need my "viewer" :) –  Paul Jul 15 '09 at 10:58
12  
localhost:8888/_ah/admin worked like a champ for me (note the port changed) - but I will try out the AppWrench just for comparison. –  Chad Gorshing Apr 30 '10 at 4:14
    
Thank you so much! I really needed this to debug a persistence issue. –  SunnyD Oct 24 '12 at 18:04

There's currently no datastore viewer for the Java SDK - one should be coming in the next SDK release. In the meantime, your best bet is to write your own admin interface with datastore viewing code - or wait for the next SDK release.

Java App Engine now has a local datastore viewer, accessible at http://localhost:8080/_ah/admin.

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This is redundant -- see dfrankow's post above. –  Julian Aug 27 '09 at 9:37
22  
You mean the link to the blog post that was posted several days after I posted this reply? 'outdated' I'll accept, but redundant and voted down is a bit cruel. –  Nick Johnson Aug 27 '09 at 15:53
1  
I agree. Good answer at the time; now outdated. –  mcherm Oct 25 '09 at 21:47
    
@mcherm this one worked for me. The other answers here, on the other side, didn't. –  Stas S Jul 27 at 11:54

I have local datastore on my Windows+Eclipse environment on \war\WEB-INF\appengine-generated\local_db.bin

As far as I understood it uses internal format named "protocol buffers". I don't have external tools to present the file in human-readable format.

I'm using simple "viewer" code like this:

public void doGet(HttpServletRequest req, HttpServletResponse resp) 
    throws IOException 
{

    resp.setContentType("text/plain");

    final DatastoreService datastore = DatastoreServiceFactory.getDatastoreService();
    final Query query = new Query("Table/Entity Name");
    //query.addSort(Entity.KEY_RESERVED_PROPERTY, Query.SortDirection.DESCENDING);

    for (final Entity entity : datastore.prepare(query).asIterable()) {
        resp.getWriter().println(entity.getKey().toString());

        final Map<String, Object> properties = entity.getProperties();
        final String[] propertyNames = properties.keySet().toArray(
            new String[properties.size()]);
        for(final String propertyName : propertyNames) {
            resp.getWriter().println("-> " + propertyName + ": " + entity.getProperty(propertyName));
        }
    }
}
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The code is good, but the parameter for the query constructor is wrong: Table is not correct, it mus be the Entity name. In the guestbook example it would be "greeting" which is the row. I tried this, but not working:final Query query = new Query("Guestbook/Greeting"); Another issue: How do you show the content of different keys/names of a table with your code? Like guestbook1, gb2, etc. –  Timo Mar 12 '14 at 15:09

In the newest versions of the SDK (1.7.6+) the admin part of the dev server comes with it changed its location

Analyzing the server output logs we can see that it is accessible at:

http://localhost:8000

And the Datastore viewer:

http://localhost:8000/datastore

Looks pretty neat - according to google's new design guidlines.

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Because Google App Engines Datastore viewer does not support displaying collections of referenced entities, I modified Paul's version to display all descendant entities:

public void doGet(HttpServletRequest req, HttpServletResponse resp) throws IOException {
    String entityParam = req.getParameter("e");

    resp.setContentType("text/plain");
    final DatastoreService datastore = DatastoreServiceFactory.getDatastoreService();

    // Original query
    final Query queryOrig = new Query(entityParam);
    queryOrig.addSort(Entity.KEY_RESERVED_PROPERTY, Query.SortDirection.ASCENDING);

    for (final Entity entityOrig : datastore.prepare(queryOrig).asIterable()) {

        // Query for this entity and all its descendant entities and collections
        final Query query = new Query();
        query.setAncestor(entityOrig.getKey());
        query.addSort(Entity.KEY_RESERVED_PROPERTY, Query.SortDirection.ASCENDING);

        for (final Entity entity : datastore.prepare(query).asIterable()) {
            resp.getWriter().println(entity.getKey().toString());

            // Print properties
            final Map<String, Object> properties = entity.getProperties();
            final String[] propertyNames = properties.keySet().toArray(new String[properties.size()]);
            for(final String propertyName : propertyNames) {
                resp.getWriter().println("-> " + propertyName + ": " + entity.getProperty(propertyName));
            }
        }
    }
}

It should be noted that nothing is displayed for empty collections/referenced entities.

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Open the \war\WEB-INF\appengine-generated\local_db.bin file with a text editor, like Notepad++.

The data is scrambled but at least you can read it and you can be copy to extract it.

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