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I made a small program to download data and write it to a file.

Here is the code:

public void run()
{

    byte[] bytes = new byte[1024];
    int bytes_read;

    URLConnection urlc = null;
    RandomAccessFile raf = null;
    InputStream i = null;


    try
    {
         raf = new RandomAccessFile("file1", "rw");
    }
    catch(Exception e)
    {
        e.printStackTrace();
        return;
    }

    try
    {
         urlc =  new URL(link).openConnection();
         i = urlc.getInputStream();
    }
    catch(Exception e)
    {
        e.printStackTrace();
        return;
    }

    while(canDownload())
    {
        try
        {
            bytes_read = i.read(bytes);
        }
        catch(Exception e)
        {
            e.printStackTrace();
            return;
        }

        if(bytes_read != -1)
        {
            try
            {
                raf.write(bytes, 0, bytes_read);
            }
            catch(Exception e)
            {
                e.printStackTrace();
                return;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            try
            {
                i.close();
                raf.close();
                return;
            }
            catch(Exception e)
            {
                e.printStackTrace();
                return;
            }
        }
    }
}

The problem is that when I download big files, I get few bytes missing in the end of the file. I tried to change the byte array size to 2K, and the problem was solved. But when I downloaded a bigger file (500 MB) , I got few bytes missing again. I said "Ok, let's try with 4K size". And I changed the byte array size to 4K. It worked! Nice, but then I downloaded a 4 GB file, I got bytes missing in the end again! I said "Cool, let's try with 8K size". And then I changed the byte array size to 8K. Worked.

My first question is: Why this happens? (when I change buffer size, the file doesn't get corrupted).

Ok, in theory, the file corrupted problem can be solved changing the byte array size to bigger values. But there's another problem: how can I measure the download speed (in one second interval) with big byte array sizes?

For example: Let's say that my download speed is 2 KB/s. And the byte array size is 4 K. My second question is: How can I measure the speed (in one second interval) if the thread will have to wait the byte array to be full? My answer should be: change the byte array size to a smaller value. But the file will get corrupted xD.

After trying to solve the problem by myself, I spent 2 days searching over the internet for a solution. And nothing.

Please, can you guys answer my two questions? Thanks =D

Edit

Code for canDownload():

synchronized private boolean canDownload()
{
    return can_download;
}
share|improve this question
2  
Show the code for canDownload() –  Jim Garrison Jun 13 '12 at 23:10
    
I added to the question text. –  Yuri Jun 13 '12 at 23:32
    
Let's say your file size is 300*2k+35 bytes, are you missing the last 35 bytes? –  user1452132 Jun 13 '12 at 23:39
    
No. Yesterday I downloaded the same file twice, with the same byte array size. One got corrupted and the other didn't. I tried to download a very small file (less than 1KB) with byte array size = 8k, and it didn't get corrupted. –  Yuri Jun 13 '12 at 23:44
    
You showed the code but you didn't answer the real question. When is can_download set to false? It appears that it is being cleared prematurely. –  EJP Jun 14 '12 at 1:53

3 Answers 3

My advice is to use a proven library such as Apache Commons IO instead of trying to roll your own code. For your particular problem, take a look at the copyURLToFile(URL, File) method.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm going to add functionality to my program (pause, resume, etc). And I need to measure the download speed. This a download manager prototype. –  Yuri Jun 14 '12 at 0:00

I would:

  1. Change the RandomAccessFile to a FileOutputStream.

  2. Get rid of canDownload(), whatever it's for, and set a read timeout on the connection instead.

  3. Simplify the copy loop to this:

    while ((bytes_read = i.read(bytes)) > 0) { out.write(bytes, 0, bytes_read); } out.close(); i.close();

with all the exception handling outside this loop.

share|improve this answer
    
I want to add functionality to my program (like pausing and resuming downloads). And I need RandomAccessFile for that. canDownload() is useless now, but soon it will be used to control user commands to the download. What's the problem with exception handling inside the loop? –  Yuri Jun 14 '12 at 9:57

I think you will find the problem is that you closed the underlying InputStream while the RandomAccessFile still had data in its write buffers. This will be why you are occasionally missing the last few bytes of data.

The race condition is between the JVM flushing the final write, and your call to i.close().

Removing the i.close() should fix the problem; it isn't necessary as the raf.close() closes the underlying stream anyway, but this way you give the RAF a chance to flush any outstanding buffers before it does so.

share|improve this answer
    
But if I remove i.close(), the connection will not be closed, and I want to close that connection after the download end. I didn't understand the relationship between raf.write() and i.close(). For me, what matters is the byte buffer size (please look at my two questions). –  Yuri Jun 14 '12 at 13:14
    
As I said, raf.close() closes the underlying stream. Your buffer size is completely irrelevant to your problem. What matters is that you are not properly flushing java.io's buffers before closing the stream/exiting the vm. The obvious culprit is the extraneous i.close(). As far as measuring the speed is concerned, you have the aggregate bytes read, and System.getCurrentTimeMillis() will tell you how long you have been downloading. Of course, @Anthony-accioly is right, if you had used org.apache.commons.io.input.CountingInputStream you would be finished already. –  Recurse Jun 15 '12 at 10:05
    
@Recurse I don't think you are correct. There is no relation between the InputStream i and the RandomAccessFile raf; where do you see that? i.close() is not extraneous at all. In addition, RandomAccessFile does not have a buffer so there is nothing to flush after calling raf.write(). –  user845279 Jun 17 '12 at 23:03
    
That's my point. raf and i are not related. They only use the same byte array. And yes, the buffer size is relevant, because if I change it to a higher value, the file won't get corrupted. And as I said, I need to deal with the opened connection, I can't just delete i.close(). –  Yuri Jun 18 '12 at 15:28
    
@Recurse, How can I use org.apache.commons.io.input.CountingInputStream to measure the speed within 1 second interval, with a very low download speed (less than 1KB/s)? I'll have to wait until the byte array get filled with the bytes downloaded to get the amount of bytes downloaded? If yes, the speed problem is still unsolved. –  Yuri Jun 18 '12 at 16:19

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