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private String setDate(int day) {
    Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
    cal.setTime(new Date());
    cal.add(Calendar.DATE, + day);
    DateFormat df = DateFormat.getDateInstance(DateFormat.SHORT, locale);
    String formattedDate = df.format(cal.getTime());
    return formattedDate;
}

The above method returns "14/06/12" for Locale.UK and "06/14/12" for Locale.US.

How can I get it to return the year in full, i.e. "14/06/2012" for the US locale and "06/14/2012" for UK locale?

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2  
String pattern = sdf.toPattern().replaceAll("y+","yyyy"); sdf.applyPattern(pattern); –  dragon66 Jun 14 '12 at 0:55
    
Works perfectly! Thanks –  Amir Ghahrai Jun 14 '12 at 1:00
1  
@dragon66: you have the best answer so far - please post it as an answer. You might like to include this note from the javadoc: "If you want even more control over the format or parsing, (or want to give your users more control), you can try casting the DateFormat you get from the factory methods to a SimpleDateFormat. This will work for the majority of countries; just remember to put it in a try block in case you encounter an unusual one." –  Greg Kopff Jun 14 '12 at 1:43
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Juniad's answer is almost complete. The only thing needs to be done is to make it work for all locales.

import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;
import java.text.DateFormat;
import java.text.ParseException;
import java.util.Calendar;
import java.util.Locale;

class ChangeDateFormat
{
    private String setDate(int day, Locale locale) {
        Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
        cal.add(Calendar.DATE, +day);
        DateFormat df = DateFormat.getDateInstance(DateFormat.SHORT, locale);
        if (df instanceof SimpleDateFormat)
        {
            SimpleDateFormat sdf = (SimpleDateFormat) df;
            // To show Locale specific short date expression with full year
            String pattern = sdf.toPattern().replaceAll("y+","yyyy");
            sdf.applyPattern(pattern); 
            return sdf.format(cal.getTime());
        }
        String formattedDate = df.format(cal.getTime());
        return formattedDate;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        ChangeDateFormat cdf = new ChangeDateFormat();        
        System.out.println(cdf.setDate(1, Locale.JAPAN));
    }
}

Following Greg's comments (thanks Greg), here is the relevant note from the javadoc:

"If you want even more control over the format or parsing, (or want to give your users more control), you can try casting the DateFormat you get from the factory methods to a SimpleDateFormat. This will work for the majority of countries; just remember to put it in a try block in case you encounter an unusual one."

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Nice one. replace instead of concat. It dint strike my mind because of the hurry. Good answer. –  JHS Jun 14 '12 at 6:25
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You have to hope that your DateFormat is an instance of SimpleDateFormat, so that you can obtain its pattern and change it from two to four years.

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Thanks. But if I use a pattern and format it then it gives me either 2012 for a pattern of "yyyy" or if I use a pattern like "MM/dd/YYYY" is not desirable for UK, and the pattern "dd/MM/YYYY" is not desirable for US. –  Amir Ghahrai Jun 13 '12 at 23:40
    
@AmirGhahrai It looks as if Juniad has explained it better than I did. –  Neil Jun 13 '12 at 23:43
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You will have to get the locale pattern and append the extra yy to the format.

This could help you -

private String setDate(int day) {
  Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
  cal.setTime(new Date());
  cal.add(Calendar.DATE, + day);    
  DateFormat df = DateFormat.getDateInstance(DateFormat.SHORT, locale);
  // code modified from here
  SimpleDateFormat sdf = (SimpleDateFormat) df;
  sdf.applyPattern(sdf.toPattern().replace("yy","yyyy")); // replacing to yyyy
  String formattedDate = sdf.format(cal.getTime());
  return formattedDate;
}

This would work for all patterns which return a 2 digit year in the end.

I had sdf.toPattern.concat("yy") which would work for only those Locale who had yy in the end. However Dragon66's idea to use replace("yy", "yyyy") would work for all Locale.

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1  
The original pattern, assuming it is a simple date format, does not necessarily end in yy. –  Neil Jun 13 '12 at 23:45
    
The solution is for the combination of the DateFormat intand most of the Locale and for Date it ends in yy. Also I have added a line in the end - Only for patterns which has a 2 digit year in the end. For US and UK it is fine. –  JHS Jun 13 '12 at 23:52
1  
Thanks guys. very helpful. Although it is perfect for UK, US, it seems to fail for Locales that have the date start from year, e.g. Japan is 2012-06-14 and using the above solution I get 12-06-1412 –  Amir Ghahrai Jun 14 '12 at 0:08
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