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I am newbie at Perl. I am trying to write a Perl script that prints the content of all the files in a directory and recursively do it till all the files in the directories/sub-directories are printed. I am doing it with the following subroutine.

sub print_files_in_dir {
my $file = shift;
if(-d $file){
 my @files=glob "$file/*";
  foreach my $file (@files){
   if(-d $file){
    print_files_in_dir $file;
   }
   else {
    print_file $file;
   }
 } 
 else {
  print_file $file;
 }
}

where print_file is sub which prints the content of a single file. I get this error with I try to execute this code with a directory say dir1 which contains another directory named dir2.

Can't locate object method "print_files_in_dir" via package "dir1/dir2" (perhaps you forgot to load "dir1/dir2"?)

Cant figure out why is it throwing this error ?

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2  
Any reason that you are not using File::Find or some other File::Find* library?? –  runrig Jun 14 '12 at 2:11
    
I was just doing it as an exercise as I am new to Perl. Also I don't know about the File::Find* –  comatose Jun 14 '12 at 17:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

As you learned, omitting parens around argument lists can give you really weird errors. Some are even silent. For example, print (4+6)*2 prints 10! (ok, it'll warn if you have warnings on as you should, so it's not really silent, but it's not fatal either.) One must be careful if one is omits those parens.

I'm writing this because I noticed a problem with your glob; it won't work if the path has certain characters in them, such as spaces.

 glob "$file/*"

should be

 glob "\Q$file\E/*"

And since I'm here, there's a bit of redundancy that can be eliminated. Your sub collapses to:

sub print_files_in_dir {
   my $file = shift;
   if (-d $file) {
      print_files_in_dir($_) for glob "\Q$file\E/*";
   } else {
      print_file($file);
   }
}

Actually, you could use File::Find::Rule to collapse it further.

use File::Find::Rule qw( );
print_file($_) for File::Find::Rule->file->in('.');
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Thank you for a very well written answer, and also for showing me the redundancy in the code :) –  comatose Jun 14 '12 at 17:54

You're running afoul of "indirect function calls", which are a confusing OOP feature which can cause the line:

print_files_in_dir $file;

to be parsed as if you said this, which means something completely different and unintended:

$file->print_files_in_dir();

Use parentheses on your function calls (like so) and this won't happen:

print_files_in_dir($file);

Same goes for print_file.

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2  
You could also declare the sub before you use it by adding sub print_files_in_dir;. (But I'd go with the parens.) –  ikegami Jun 14 '12 at 0:24

At the point you are calling print_files_in_dir the compiler hasn't seen the complete definition of the subroutine so it doesn't know what it is. From the syntax you have used, its best guess is that it is a method call.

You can correct this guess by predeclaring the subroutine before you define it, like this

sub print_files_in_dir;

sub print_files_in_dir {

  my $file = shift;

  if (-d $file) {

    my @files = glob "$file/*";

    foreach my $file (@files) {

      if (-d $file) {
        print_files_in_dir $file;
      }
      else {
        print_file $file;
      }
    }
  } 
  else {
    print_file $file;
  }
}
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If your motive is to list files recursively, try this:

     system("ls -R")
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