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Since VS 2005, I see that it is not possible to simply build a dll against MS runtime and deploy them together (http://www.ddj.com/windows/184406482). I am deeply confused by manifest, SxS and co: MSDN documentation is really poor, with circular references; specially since I am more a Unix guy, I find all those uninformative. My core problem is linking a dll against msvc9 or msvc8: since those runtime are not redistributable, what are the steps to link and deploy such a dll ? In particular, how are the manifest generated (I don't want mt.exe, I want something which is portable across compilers), how are they embedded, used ? What does Side by side assembly mean ?

Basically, where can I find any kind of specification instead of MS jargon ?

Thank you to everyone who answered, this was really helpful,

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8 Answers 8

up vote 3 down vote accepted

We use a simple include file in all our applications & DLL's, vcmanifest.h, then set all projects to embedded the manifest file.

vcmanifest.h

/*----------------------------------------------------------------------------*/

#if _MSC_VER >= 1400

/*----------------------------------------------------------------------------*/

#pragma message ( "Setting up manifest..." )

/*----------------------------------------------------------------------------*/

#ifndef _CRT_ASSEMBLY_VERSION
#include <crtassem.h>
#endif 

/*----------------------------------------------------------------------------*/

#ifdef WIN64
    #pragma message ( "processorArchitecture=amd64" )
    #define MF_PROCESSORARCHITECTURE "amd64"
#else
    #pragma message ( "processorArchitecture=x86" )
    #define MF_PROCESSORARCHITECTURE "x86"
#endif 

/*----------------------------------------------------------------------------*/

#pragma message ( "Microsoft.Windows.Common-Controls=6.0.0.0") 
#pragma comment ( linker,"/manifestdependency:\"type='win32' " \
    			  "name='Microsoft.Windows.Common-Controls' " \
    			  "version='6.0.0.0' " \
    			  "processorArchitecture='" MF_PROCESSORARCHITECTURE "' " \
    			  "publicKeyToken='6595b64144ccf1df'\"" )

/*----------------------------------------------------------------------------*/

#ifdef _DEBUG
    #pragma message ( __LIBRARIES_ASSEMBLY_NAME_PREFIX ".DebugCRT=" _CRT_ASSEMBLY_VERSION ) 
    #pragma comment(linker,"/manifestdependency:\"type='win32' "            \
    		"name='" __LIBRARIES_ASSEMBLY_NAME_PREFIX ".DebugCRT' "         \
    		"version='" _CRT_ASSEMBLY_VERSION "' "                          \
    		"processorArchitecture='" MF_PROCESSORARCHITECTURE "' "         \
    		"publicKeyToken='" _VC_ASSEMBLY_PUBLICKEYTOKEN "'\"")
#else
    #pragma message ( __LIBRARIES_ASSEMBLY_NAME_PREFIX ".CRT=" _CRT_ASSEMBLY_VERSION ) 
    #pragma comment(linker,"/manifestdependency:\"type='win32' "            \
    		"name='" __LIBRARIES_ASSEMBLY_NAME_PREFIX ".CRT' "              \
    		"version='" _CRT_ASSEMBLY_VERSION "' "                          \
    		"processorArchitecture='" MF_PROCESSORARCHITECTURE "' "         \
    		"publicKeyToken='" _VC_ASSEMBLY_PUBLICKEYTOKEN "'\"")
#endif

/*----------------------------------------------------------------------------*/

#ifdef _MFC_ASSEMBLY_VERSION
    #ifdef _DEBUG
    	#pragma message ( __LIBRARIES_ASSEMBLY_NAME_PREFIX ".MFC=" _CRT_ASSEMBLY_VERSION ) 
    	#pragma comment(linker,"/manifestdependency:\"type='win32' "            \
    			"name='" __LIBRARIES_ASSEMBLY_NAME_PREFIX ".MFC' "              \
    			"version='" _MFC_ASSEMBLY_VERSION "' "                          \
    			"processorArchitecture='" MF_PROCESSORARCHITECTURE "' "         \
    			"publicKeyToken='" _VC_ASSEMBLY_PUBLICKEYTOKEN "'\"")
    #else
    	#pragma message ( __LIBRARIES_ASSEMBLY_NAME_PREFIX ".MFC=" _CRT_ASSEMBLY_VERSION ) 
    	#pragma comment(linker,"/manifestdependency:\"type='win32' "            \
    			"name='" __LIBRARIES_ASSEMBLY_NAME_PREFIX ".MFC' "              \
    			"version='" _MFC_ASSEMBLY_VERSION "' "                          \
    			"processorArchitecture='" MF_PROCESSORARCHITECTURE "' "         \
    			"publicKeyToken='" _VC_ASSEMBLY_PUBLICKEYTOKEN "'\"")
    #endif
#endif /* _MFC_ASSEMBLY_VERSION */

/*----------------------------------------------------------------------------*/

#endif /* _MSC_VER */

/*----------------------------------------------------------------------------*/
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1  
I hope you are still checking this thread. I unfortunately am not able to use your file as is. Where do I include this file? What do I do if I want to support a lower version than on the client's PC than on the developer's PC? Any suggestions you can provide would be blessing. If not I will post another question to stackoverflow. –  ossandcad Sep 25 '10 at 7:37

The simplest thing to do: Assuming a default install of VS2005, you will have a path like:

C:\Program Files\Microsoft Visual Studio 8\VC\redist\x86\Microsoft.VC80.CRT

Go, grab the files in this redist folder, and place the .manifest AND the msvcr80.dll (At least) in your applications .exe folder. These files, present in the root of your installation, should enable your exe and all dlls linked against them, to work flawlessly without resorting to merge modules, MSIs or indeed any kind of just-in-time detection that the runtime is not installed.

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Here is the blog entry explaining the rational behind the SxS crt decision for VC++. It includes explaining how bad it is to statically link the crt, and why you shouldn't do that.

Here is the documentation on how to statically link the crt.

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Thanks for the links. The first in particular makes some things a bit clearer. I don't need to be convinced for static linking the C runtime; the problematic is the same on any OS. –  David Cournapeau Sep 21 '08 at 8:13

Well, I've encountered some of these issues, so perhaps some of my comments will be helpful.

  1. The manifest is an xml file. While VS can and will make one for you when you compile, the other solution is to produce a resource file (.rc) and compile it into a compiled resource file (.res) using the resource compiler (rc.exe) included with VS. You'll want to run the VS commandline from the tools menu, which will cause rc to be in the path, as well as setting various environmental variables correctly. Then compile your resource. The resulting .res file can be used by other compilers.
  2. Make sure your manifest xml file's size is divisible by 4. Add whitespace in the middle of it to achieve this if needed. Try to avoid having any characters before the openning xml tag or after the closing xml tag. I've sometimes had issues with this. If you do step 2 incorrectly, expect to get side by side configuration errors. You can check if that is your mistake by openning the exe in a resource editor (e.g. devenv.exe) and examining the manifest resource. You can also see an example of a correct manifest by just opening a built file, though note that dlls and exes have tiny differences in what id the resource should be given.

You'll probably want to test on Vista to make sure this is working properly.

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They are redistributable and you have redistributable packages inside msvs directory.

Build with runtime of your choice, add corresponding package to your installer and don't bother - it will work. The difference is - they are installed in a different place now (but that is also where your app is going to look for libraries).

Otherwise, MSDN or basically any not-too-old book on windows c++ programming.

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Mh, strange, I could swear I saw somewhere on the MSDN you could not redistribute those, but now I can't find the link anymore, I must have misread. Using the redistributable package is not an option (I do not use MSI), though. –  David Cournapeau Sep 21 '08 at 8:26
    
You can't redistribute the debug CRT. The release one is intended to be redistributed. –  Nicolás Aug 9 '13 at 1:16

Thanks for the answer. For deployment per se, I can see 3 options, then:

  • Using .msi merge directive.
  • Using the redistributable VS package and run it before my own installer
  • Copying the redistributable files along my own application. But in this case, how do I refer to it in a filesystem hierarchy (say bar/foo1/foo1.dll and bar/foo2/foo2.dll refer to msvcr90.dll in bar/) ? I mean besides the obvious and ugly "copy the dll in every directory where you have dll which depends on it).
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If you bundle the redist files (as per my reply) with your app, place them in the same folder as the exe. Thankfully, the fusion loader still looks in the exe folder first, when attempting to find dlls. –  Chris Becke Oct 22 '08 at 14:24

You can't use the VC++8 SP1/9 CRT as a merge module on Vista and windows Server 2008 if you have services you want to start or programs that you want to run before the "InstallFinalize" action in the MSI.

This is because the dlls are installed in WinSXS in the "InstallFinalize" action.

But the MSI "ServiceStart" action comes before this.

So use either a bootstrapper "http://www.davidguyer.us/bmg/publish.htm"

Or look into using the installer chainging in the installer 4.5. But this means you need a bootstrapper to install 4.5 so it seems a bit pointless..

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If you intend to deploy the Microsoft DLLs/.manifest files and are using Java JNI then you will need to put them in the bin directory of your JDK/JRE.

If you are running the app in JBoss, then you will need to put them in the JBoss/bin directory.

You can put your JNI DLL where appropriate for your application.

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