Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Problem Given a boolean expression consisting of the symbols 0, 1, &, |, ^ and a desired boolean result value, implement a function to count the number of ways of parenthesizing the expression such that it evaluates to result.
Example
Expression 1^0|0|1
Desired Result 0
Output 2, 1^((0|0)|1), 1^(0|(0|1))

My idea is to use backtracking, and evaluate an expression of the form a operator b. For example
1^0|0|1
-------
0123456

There are 3 possible evaluations: 0, 2, 4, more specifically, I have:
(1) evaluate at 0 -> 1|0|1
(2) evaluate at 0 -> 1|1
(3) evaluate at 0 -> 1

Then I backtrack at (2), to evaluate at position 2... The idea is very simple, but it produced duplicate result. The number of ways for result = 1 should be 3 but my approach yields 4.

bool evaluate(const string& expr) {
    assert(expr.length() == 3);
    assert(expr[0] == '0' || expr[0] == '1');
    assert(expr[1] == '^' || expr[1] == '|' || expr[1] == '&');
    assert(expr[2] == '0' || expr[2] == '1');

    bool result;
    bool a = (expr[0] == '1' ? 1 : 0);
    bool b = (expr[2] == '1' ? 1 : 0);

    switch (expr[1]) {
        case '^' :
            result = a ^ b;
            break;

        case '|' :
            result = a | b;
            break;

        case '&' :
            result = a & b;
            break;
    }

    return result;
}

void transform_at(string& s, int start) {
    bool result = evaluate(s.substr(start, 3));
    string left = s.substr(0, start);
    string right = s.substr(start + 3);
    result ? left.append(1, '1') : left.append(1, '0');
    s = left + right;
}

int count_parenthese_grouping(string expr, const bool result) {
    cout << "[recurse on]: " << expr << endl;
    if (expr.length() == 3 && evaluate(expr) == result) {
        return 1;
    }
    else if (expr.length() == 3 && evaluate(expr) != result) {
        return 0;
    }
    else {
        int operators = expr.length() - 2;
        int total = 0;

        for (int i = 0; i < operators; i += 2) {
            string temp = expr;
            transform_at(expr, i);
            total += count_parenthese_grouping(expr, result);
            expr = temp;
        }

        return total;
    }
}

I couldn't see how this solution generated duplicate result! Could anyone help me out?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The duplication comes from the fact that you can arrive at (1^0)|(0|0) in two ways: first, parenthesize 1^0 then 0|0; second, parenthesize 0|0 then 1^0.

You need to ensure that you only count the same parenthesizing once.

A possible approach is to calculate an identifing number from the parenthesizing, then maintain a set of these id numbers and only count the ones that were not in the set yet.

One possibility for such id would be to represent the parentheses in a bit pattern: the first n-1 bits representing first-level parhentheses, the next n-2 bits representing second-level parentheses (parentheses containing first-level ones), etc.

so for example

(1^0)|0|0   would become 10000
1^(0|0)|0   would become 01000
1^0|(0|0)   would become 00100
(1^0)|(0|0) would become 10100
(1^(0|0))|0 would become 01010
1^((0|0)|0) would become 01001
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot. Sorry I couldn't vote you up since I don't have enough reputations. –  iori Jun 14 '12 at 0:36
    
@iori - You can still accept the answer if it helped you solve the problem –  Attila Jun 14 '12 at 0:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.