Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a problem with my SQL Query which runs flawlessly fast unless it returns no results.

I have 4 Tables : worlds (2 items), players (about 2000 items), world_chunk (about 16000 items) and world_block (about 1 million items)

 SELECT bid,playername FROM worlds 
 JOIN world_chunks ON worlds.id = world_chunks.mainid 
 JOIN world_blocks ON world_chunks.cid = world_blocks.cid 
 JOIN players ON world_blocks.player = players.pid 
 WHERE worldname='world' AND x='-684' AND y='63' AND z='-2234' AND cx ='-43' AND cz='-140'

x,y,z are held in world_blocks and cx,cz are held in world_chunks and worldname in worlds All Indexes are set and it is really fast for everything but empty results.

Is there anyway I could speed up empty results?

Thanks alot for you guys help.

EDIT: Here is the db structure: http://pastebin.com/rxQQ5mzp

Its MySQL InnoDB

EXPLAIN on Emtpy Query:
1   SIMPLE  worlds  ALL PRIMARY,idx_mainid  NULL    NULL    NULL    2      Using where
1   SIMPLE  world_blocks    ALL NULL    NULL    NULL    NULL    766845  Using where; Using join buffer
1   SIMPLE  world_chunks    eq_ref  PRIMARY,idx_cid PRIMARY 4   WatchBlock.world_blocks.cid 1   Using where
1   SIMPLE  players eq_ref  PRIMARY,idx_pid PRIMARY 4   WatchBlock.world_blocks.player  1   

EXPLAIN on Found Query:
1   SIMPLE  worlds  ALL PRIMARY,idx_mainid  NULL    NULL    NULL    2   Using where
1   SIMPLE  world_blocks    ALL NULL    NULL    NULL    NULL    766845  Using where; Using join buffer
1   SIMPLE  world_chunks    eq_ref  PRIMARY,idx_cid PRIMARY 4   WatchBlock.world_blocks.cid 1   Using where
1   SIMPLE  players eq_ref  PRIMARY,idx_pid PRIMARY 4   WatchBlock.world_blocks.player  1 

The Result can be empty as x,y,z and cx,cz dont match (so if one of each of those is not in db the result of player should be empty)

share|improve this question
    
"All Indexes are set" All?! Do you mean that you have a single column index on each column? Or do you mean you tried all possible multi-column indexes, including all permutations of columns? I doubt you did that. Can you please show what indexes you do have. –  Mark Byers Jun 14 '12 at 0:18
    
Please post an EXPLAIN of both a positive result and a negative result. –  philwinkle Jun 14 '12 at 0:20
    
I have set Index on id,mainid, cid, pid –  user1455025 Jun 14 '12 at 0:20
    
What table are x, y, z, etc on? –  Sam Dufel Jun 14 '12 at 0:31
    
Is this the whole query? Are you using LIMIT? –  Ami Jun 14 '12 at 0:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Philwinkle is right, it isn't particularly appropriate to post an SQL query performance question without posting the appropriate EXPLAINs. You should also also have posted the DDL for the four tables and associated indices. You say "All Indexes are set", however in your follow comment you suggest that the only indices you have are on the primary keys, which is insufficient for the query troubling you.

For a performance issue it is also useful to note which database you are using, and what table types you are using: your tag suggests this is mysql, which means myisam vs innodb is a critical piece of information you fail to provide. Finally, you claim 'empty' results are slow, however you don't explain why the empty results are empty, is it empty because one of the joins was empty, or because one of the coordinates didn't match (and if so, the world_block, or world_chunk coordinates).

If you provided the EXPLAIN data and basic DDL, I wouldn't be writing this as the question would most likely have been answered by now; as it stands, until you do, this question can't reasonably be answered.

The best I can offer is, you probably need to add at least one index covering some or all of the (x,y,z) and (cx,cy) coordinates; but that is just an educated guess.

EDIT:

Thank-you for the EXPLAIN, that helps. As you have no doubt noted already, the full table scan of world_blocks is the most likely culprit. Given the small size of the database, the index you added for (cid,x,y,z) probably did the most to help. A couple of other points however:

If this is an ingest+read database then MyISAM is a reasonable choice, but if you intend to perform online UPDATE or DELETE operations you are much better off sticking with InnoDB. The real benefit of InnoDB is the concurrency/scalability improvements more than referential integrity (although you shouldn't underestimate the importance of that either).

If x,y, and z are always constant in this query, you should consider moving them to the front of the index. In fact if you are using InnoDB, this EXPLAIN suggests the index should be on just (x,y,z) as including cid will only waste buffer cache. If you insist on using MyISAM you should definitely consider using a covering index on those fields referenced by the join: (x,y,z,cid,players) as this will prevent a full-row read until the final projection.

Which brings up my final points: Always run EXPLAIN as soon as you find yourself with unexplained performance quirks; Always run EXPLAIN after your unexplained performance quirks go away, and make sure it makes sense; Index behaviour for MyISAM and InnoDB are almost always different, and optimisations for one are not always optimisations for the other.

share|improve this answer
    
I added the information to the question post. I am sorry for not knowing exactly what to post. Thanks for the help! –  user1455025 Jun 14 '12 at 8:24
    
Thank you very much for the detailed information. It makes much more sense to me now. And as I infact have Concurrent delete and inserts I'll make sure to switch to innodb and use your explanations to improve my query! –  user1455025 Jun 14 '12 at 14:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.