Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

How can I rsync mirror only *.php files? This gives me a bunch of empty dirs too and I don't want those.

rsync -v -aze 'ssh ' \
--numeric-ids \
--delete \
--include '*/' \
--exclude '*' \
--include '*.php' \
user@site.com:/home/www/domain.com \
/Volumes/Servers/
share|improve this question
    
Didn't my answer solve your problem? –  Joao Figueiredo Aug 17 '12 at 15:12
1  
the trick is to also add ` --prune-empty-dirs \ ` to the list of arguments –  Poe Aug 17 '12 at 15:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The culprit here is the

--include '*/'  

When including a wildcard followed by the trailing forward-slash you're telling rsync to transfer all files ending with a '/' (that is, all directories).
Thus,

rsync -v -aze 'ssh ' \
--numeric-ids \
--delete \
--exclude '*' \
--include '*.php' \
user@site.com:/home/www/domain.com \
/Volumes/Servers/

If you were using that because you intend to recursively find all .php files, you’d have to use the ** wildcard. That is, --include '*/.php'

Another way ( http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/1481/rsync-find ) is pre-finding the target files and then using rsync,

find source -name "*.php" -print0 | rsync -av --files-from=- --from0 ./ ./destination/
share|improve this answer
    
The rsync command excluded all files, so nothing was transferred. I think what I did was use the original block I tried, and just ran a find command to delete all empty folders when it finished. –  Poe Aug 17 '12 at 15:19
1  
Yeah, the catch-all exclude should come after the include. –  G-Wiz Oct 21 '13 at 7:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.