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I am trying to match a text which contains the " ", from the log file. But it doesn't match. I understand that " " has got a special meaning to TCL/Expect.

hence I tried the following, but no luck.

expect -ex {
            "lp -c -demail -ot\\\"firstname_surname@gmail.com\\\" /usr/local/spool/pf"
            {
               incr logged
               send_user "\r\n LOGGED #4, $logged \r\n"
            }
            timeout

I tried to use \, \ and \\ but no luck yet.

Can anyone help, Please..

My log file contains the following line,

exec [lp -c -demail -ot"firstname_surname@gmail.com"  /usr/local/spool/pf/context/ABC001-1209236.mime]

and I need to match that line.

share|improve this question
    
Any chance you could use autoexpect and some silly program that prints quotes to generate the script? In my experience autoexpect could generate things that were difficult to hand-write. –  sarnold Jun 14 '12 at 2:21
    
is it possible to do it without using autoexpect? –  suj Jun 14 '12 at 3:21
    
Just noting (for anyone reading) that the description with backslashes relates to the number of backslashes (1, 2 or 3). –  Donal Fellows Jun 14 '12 at 10:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use {} quotes, which are similar to shell's single quotes. Also Tcl is sensitive to newlines, so you have to put the opening brace of a block on the previous line

expect {
    {lp -c -demail -ot"firstname_surname@gmail.com" /usr/local/spool/pf} {
       incr logged
       send_user "\r\n LOGGED #4, $logged \r\n"
     }
     timeout
}
share|improve this answer
    
HI Glenn, I tried using your suggestion as well, it worked for me.. Many Thanks, appreciated :) –  suj Jun 15 '12 at 0:50

I had to do use *, temporary fix though. But would be great if someone can tell me how to match " " in the text.

My temporary fix is,

expect {
         "lp -c -demail -ot*/usr/local/spool/printform" {     
       }
}
share|improve this answer

If you're matching something exactly, just enclose the string in {braces} itself. However, you had another problem with your code too: by putting the -ex outside, you were telling expect to match the whole lot (including your response code!) as a string. I'd be very startled if that's what your wanted! Move the flag inside the block (this works with Expect's expect and related commands only) and use the literal string that you're looking for instead of trying to double-guess the number of backslashes. You should get something like this:

expect {
    -ex {exec [lp -c -demail -ot"firstname_surname@gmail.com" /usr/local/spool/pf/context/ABC001-1209236.mime]} {
        incr logged
        send_user "\r\n LOGGED #4, $logged \r\n"
    }
    timeout
}
share|improve this answer
    
My rule of thumb is that if you are thinking about backslashing your backslashes, you've got “backslashitis” (a disease involving inflammation of the backslashes, of course) and should think about writing your code in a different way that is less prone to error. That's virtually always possible (and virtually always makes the code much clearer). –  Donal Fellows Jun 14 '12 at 10:48
    
Hi Donal, Thanks a lot for ur help. It worked !!! Many Thanks :) –  suj Jun 15 '12 at 0:43

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