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Java: Local Enums

Why do we cannot define enum within a specific method in java? If I have a scenario where I will be using those enum values in a method only not at any other place. Wouldn't it be nice to declare in method rather defining it at globally? i mean as public or default.

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marked as duplicate by Eng.Fouad, erickson, TofuBeer, Greg Kopff, kapa Jun 14 '12 at 9:12

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4 Answers 4

You cannot define at the method level as stated by the JavaDocs. (I would like to see a language that allowed that)

Nested enum types are implicitly static. It is permissible to explicitly declare a nested enum type to be static.

This implies that it is impossible to define a local (§14.3) enum, or to define an enum in an inner class (§8.1.3).

What you can do it declare it at the class level and a variable at the method level:

public class Light {
    ...
    private LightSwitch position;
    private enum LightSwitch {
        On,
        Off
    }
    public void SwitchOn() {
        Switch(LightSwitch.On);
    }
    public void SwitchOff() {
        Switch(LightSwitch.Off);
    }
    private void Switch(LightSwitch pos) {
        position = pos;
    }
}
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I don't understand the necessity of the enum having a higher access level than the function that uses it. I tried writing the code that you said would not compile (ideone.com/w9LBZ). It compiled and ran. –  emory Jun 14 '12 at 5:08
    
hm. That must be C# only. The compiler will complain that the function requires a enum that is marked as private. –  Cole Johnson Jun 14 '12 at 14:25

from JLS

Nested enum types are implicitly static. It is permissible to explicitly declare a nested enum type to be static.

This implies that it is impossible to define a local (§14.3) enum, or to define an enum in an inner class (§8.1.3).

Also, they are implicitly final, generally. It's general pattern to have enums as part of class as usually they behave as a constant.

An enum type is implicitly final unless it contains at least one enum constant that has a class body.

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Jon Skeet said that enums are implicitly static.

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You cannot define enums within methods, but you can define classes, so if you really wish to design your method in this way, you can define an array of your local class object.

public void doSomething() {
    class Country {
        int population = 0;
        String name = null;

        public Country(int population, String name) {
            this.population = population;
            this.name = name;
        }

    }
    Country[] countries = { new Country(85029304, "Germany"), new Country(61492053, "Spain") };
    // do stuff with countries
}
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